TERRY AND THE MYSTERIOUS MONKEY by Hugh Coryell
Kirkus Star

TERRY AND THE MYSTERIOUS MONKEY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The blend of humor, fantasy and imaginative handling of realism that make Mary Pappas, a 20th century classic find echo in the liveliness of narration, saltiness of humor, economy of expression in this delectable book. It is a gay and rewardingly humorous story of a misunderstood 10-year-old and an organ grinder and monkey team who open his eyes to awareness of the other side of society. Terry is always in the wrong; at home for making too much noise, squirting grapefruit juice in the wrong direction; at school for having a messy desk, for the teacher's lost glasses; at play for being in the way of the bully, Knuckles Upper. There seems no way out until Ricco and his talking monkey come to the rescue. A skill in making himself invisible is an asset for Ricco. He helps Terry trounce Knuckles, he exposes the teacher's short-comings, he restores Terry's friend, old Mrs. Smalley's land rights from the grasp of her son-in-law. These rewarding schemes, spiced with the savour of Ricco's wonderful spaghetti, flavor the book. And before the end of his adventures, Terry regains his human guise in order to take matters into his own hands in a plot to spoil his sister's first formal. Even the monkey is once again just an ordinary animal. Zestful fantasy handled like realism, this is a refreshing bit of nonsense. William Ressler's cartoon-type drawings have a quality of design, while capturing much of the movement and personality of the text.

Pub Date: April 7th, 1952
Publisher: Winston