THE SOUND OF WHITE WATER by Hugh Fosburgh

THE SOUND OF WHITE WATER

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A fishing trip down the Big River in the north country is toned by the many moods of the outdoor world, by the carefree release of days idling under a summer sun, by the more demanding pressence of danger deliberately challenged. For Pete Gay, these fourteen days spent each year with Ben Pierson, an old friend, and this time with Tony- a novice are a happy hiatus in a life lived alone for Pete has found that trapping is a one-man business, and the years in the big woods have given him a rough wisdom. The high spirits of the first days give way to the more serene contentment of fishing, hunting, setting up camp; Tony's first introduction to fear- as they ride the rapids- almost reaches a point of panic; buck, trout, coon, pike, even a mink vary the pursuit- the catch and the kill; and for the old-timer, Pote, there is a final test of courage when he cuts a fish hook out of his thumb, and, handicapped by an ugly wound, his canoe capsizes in vicious waters.... Something more than Just a sporting outing, there's much of the mystique as well as the magic of a primal world, and Fosburgh, a writer of considerable vitality (The Hunter View From the Air, etc.) makes the most of a slight narrative.

Pub Date: Sept. 12th, 1955
Publisher: Scribner