THE CAMERA ALWAYS LIES by Hugh Hood

THE CAMERA ALWAYS LIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Canadian Hugh Hood wrote the slightly more substantial White Figure, White Ground in 1964 (Dutton) but this one's no more than skin deep--a lanolized entertainment about the motion picture industry and Rose Leclair who when first met has swallowed too many sleeping pills. Until then she's had a clearly stable marriage, fifteen years, and projected a somewhat ""virtuous"" (like Deborah Kerr). But now her husband has divorced her and her last movie had been a personal disaster--all the exposure had been given to a new Candy kid-kitten. However, there's Jean-Pierre Faure, an art movie director, who believes in higher, inner values and falls in love with Rose.... It's not hard to screen the audience for this one--it's matinee material with a few concessions to sophistication on the one hand, more to sentiment.

Pub Date: Sept. 13th, 1967
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World