DOCTOR DOOLITTLE AND THE GREEN CANARY by Hugh Lofting
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DOCTOR DOOLITTLE AND THE GREEN CANARY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It is a sad task to report the last of the stories about the little doctor who learned the animals' own language -- we hope that Hugh Lofting did leave some more stories tucked in a corner somewhere about the Doctor, Jip, Dab-Dab, Gub-Gub, Too-Too and an animal world of sober, bourgeois virtues. This is the story of Pippinella, the green canary, whose opera was such a success in her series of homes, adventures outside her cage and tearful and weary search, aided by the Doctor and his circle, for her friend the window-washer man, who was really a duke. As in the other stories, the heroine overcomes life's adversities with sound common sense and with an admirable restraint of strong emotions. But it is the calm, sympathetic, respectful intervention of the Doctor, whose admirers collect his idiosyncrasies like Holmesians for delighted discussions, which guides events to a happy conclusion. Also, Doolittle fans will be glad to know that the irrepressible cockney, Cheapside, appears briefly in this one, and there are plenty of bulbous Lofting illustrations.

Pub Date: Sept. 27th, 1950
Publisher: Lippincott