NO. 21 CASTLE STREET by H.W. Katz

NO. 21 CASTLE STREET

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Here's a book that presents once more the problem -- can the public take another book on Nazi Germany, on the Jewish problem. And yet it has a holding quality, a deep emotional impact, something of the I. J. Singer quality that may carry it over the hurdles of lack of plot, slight romantic interest and the oft-repeated theme. Castle Street typifies many streets in Germany of the past; Jews and Gentiles both lived there, and the Jewish families represent the struggle between Orthodox parents and a younger generation trying to break with tradition. The novel begins with the first World War, Jews and Gentiles banded together to win victory for the Fatherland. Then the insidious permeation of Hitler, in the generation after the war. Finally, exile, for the younger members of the family, while the old people still believe it is the government -- Germans can't be that bad. It will need careful selling to go.

Publisher: Viking