THE BLACK LIST by Ian Brook

THE BLACK LIST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A successor to Jimmy Riddle is again an obstreperous satire with a similar theme and cautionary intent although London, not Africa, is the setting. Safari-ing, in reverse, Charlie Choku, a pimp, blackmailer and all-purpose crook, and two of his cronies in his Thieves' Union, come to England where ""thief not bad when he steal but should get treatment like sick man"". They are soon put to good use in the employ of Prince Omonozunu who not only believes that the age of the black man is coming but that he should be the one to usher it in. In the din of the bongo drums and the pidgen palaver, there are all kinds of ribald demonstrations (the Thieves are happily relaxed in a mammary mass culture) and violent eruptions; they help to advance Omonozunu's tribal rituals and two boys (Choku's twin nephews) and then a white girl are used for propitiatory purposes, while Omonozunu makes an unopposed entry into Parliament.... A black and white fantasy, often pushed to the point of farce, and perhaps off colour in more than one sensitive area, still combines some contemporary realities with its incongruities.

Pub Date: Oct. 18th, 1962
Publisher: Putnam