THE WONDERFUL POODLE by Ilee Bischoff

THE WONDERFUL POODLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A somewhat contrived and arch little tale, illustrated with beautifully drawn black and whites, spot drawings and some double spreads which emphasize the nostalgic quality of the story. The small boy never quite comes alive, and to an adult reader, the text mirrors a 20th century that has moved away from its early years too fast for comfort. It concerns specifically a small Hungarian princeling, unhappy in the palace where he feels that no one loves him, content only with his poodle and his tricycle. His parents, the Prince and Princess, go to balls; his English governess is cranky. So he wanders outside the castle gates and visits with the gypsies. His dog performs, his tricycle plays its part, and when his parents find him, they see for themselves what he needs and change their ways. Not a very real story- even on fantasy level; Coco the dog too seems a fairy tale product. A little precious- perhaps too continental for American children.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1949
Publisher: Crowell