An intriguing narrative foregrounds Burton’s multifaceted and complex personality, from his love of disguise and his...

THE COLLECTOR OF WORLDS

A NOVEL OF SIR RICHARD FRANCIS BURTON

The 19th-century explorer, lover, translator and spy comes to life in the pages of an epic novel.

Troyanov (Along the Ganges, 2005, etc.) begins in India with Sir Richard Francis Burton learning Hindustani and Gujarati, two of the some two-dozen languages he eventually mastered. Burton is at ease passing as a Hindu local, which is helpful to him because of his anthropological interests—and helpful to the British military because of his “reliable reports on the doings of the natives.” In India we also witness Burton’s entanglement with the exotic Kundalini, a courtesan who teaches him ways of love but whose status as a deity’s wife complicates personal relationships. The novel next skips to Arabia, where Burton disguises himself as Mirza Abdullah to undertake a hajj to Mecca. To add interest and complication, he decides to pass himself off both as a doctor (he’d dabbled in medicine for years) and as a dervish (because such dissembling “will afford him a certain licence…unusual behaviour will be forgiven”). Burton’s final adventure takes place in Africa, where he goes on a long and dangerous trek from Zanzibar to the oasis of Kazeh and thence to Lake Tanganyika. On this journey he’s accompanied by John Hanning Speke, a fellow Englishman whose approach to native culture is far different from Burton’s. Speke has nothing but contempt for the “savages” and is “constantly on the threshold of hatred” for indigenous cultures and for Burton himself. Throughout, Troyanov uses a complex narrative technique, incorporating letters and dialogue in play form.

An intriguing narrative foregrounds Burton’s multifaceted and complex personality, from his love of disguise and his intellectual interests to his sexual proclivities.

Pub Date: April 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-06-135193-8

Page Count: 464

Publisher: Ecco/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2009

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A promising debut that’s awake to emotional, political, and cultural tensions across time and continents.

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HOMEGOING

A novel of sharply drawn character studies immersed in more than 250 hard, transformative years in the African-American diaspora.

Gyasi’s debut novel opens in the mid-1700s in what is now Ghana, as tribal rivalries are exploited by British and Dutch colonists and slave traders. The daughter of one tribal leader marries a British man for financial expediency, then learns that the “castle” he governs is a holding dungeon for slaves. (When she asks what’s held there, she’s told “cargo.”) The narrative soon alternates chapters between the Ghanans and their American descendants up through the present day. On either side of the Atlantic, the tale is often one of racism, degradation, and loss: a slave on an Alabama plantation is whipped “until the blood on the ground is high enough to bathe a baby”; a freedman in Baltimore fears being sent back South with the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act; a Ghanan woman is driven mad from the abuse of a missionary and her husband’s injury in a tribal war; a woman in Harlem is increasingly distanced from (and then humiliated by) her husband, who passes as white. Gyasi is a deeply empathetic writer, and each of the novel’s 14 chapters is a savvy character portrait that reveals the impact of racism from multiple perspectives. It lacks the sweep that its premise implies, though: while the characters share a bloodline, and a gold-flecked stone appears throughout the book as a symbolic connector, the novel is more a well-made linked story collection than a complex epic. Yet Gyasi plainly has the talent to pull that off: “I will be my own nation,” one woman tells a British suitor early on, and the author understands both the necessity of that defiance and how hard it is to follow through on it.

A promising debut that’s awake to emotional, political, and cultural tensions across time and continents.

Pub Date: June 7, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-101-94713-5

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: March 2, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2016

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A love letter to the power of books and friendship.

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THE GIVER OF STARS

Women become horseback librarians in 1930s Kentucky and face challenges from the landscape, the weather, and the men around them.

Alice thought marrying attractive American Bennett Van Cleve would be her ticket out of her stifling life in England. But when she and Bennett settle in Baileyville, Kentucky, she realizes that her life consists of nothing more than staying in their giant house all day and getting yelled at by his unpleasant father, who owns a coal mine. She’s just about to resign herself to a life of boredom when an opportunity presents itself in the form of a traveling horseback library—an initiative from Eleanor Roosevelt meant to counteract the devastating effects of the Depression by focusing on literacy and learning. Much to the dismay of her husband and father-in-law, Alice signs up and soon learns the ropes from the library’s leader, Margery. Margery doesn’t care what anyone thinks of her, rejects marriage, and would rather be on horseback than in a kitchen. And even though all this makes Margery a town pariah, Alice quickly grows to like her. Along with several other women (including one black woman, Sophia, whose employment causes controversy in a town that doesn’t believe black and white people should be allowed to use the same library), Margery and Alice supply magazines, Bible stories, and copies of books like Little Women to the largely poor residents who live in remote areas. Alice spends long days in terrible weather on horseback, but she finally feels happy in her new life in Kentucky, even as her marriage to Bennett is failing. But her powerful father-in-law doesn’t care for Alice’s job or Margery’s lifestyle, and he’ll stop at nothing to shut their library down. Basing her novel on the true story of the Pack Horse Library Project established by the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s, Moyes (Still Me, 2018, etc.) brings an often forgotten slice of history to life. She writes about Kentucky with lush descriptions of the landscape and tender respect for the townspeople, most of whom are poor, uneducated, and grateful for the chance to learn. Although Alice and Margery both have their own romances, the true power of the story is in the bonds between the women of the library. They may have different backgrounds, but their commitment to helping the people of Baileyville brings them together.

A love letter to the power of books and friendship.

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-399-56248-8

Page Count: 400

Publisher: Pamela Dorman/Viking

Review Posted Online: July 1, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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