Birds of Passage by Joe Giordano
Released: Oct. 8, 2015

"A refreshing rethink of the archetypal mafia novel."
This riveting debut novel by Giordano charts the passage of two young Italian men to early twentieth century New York, as they strive to make their mark in the New World. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 7, 2015

"A smart caper with a heroine to match."
When her new job at a movie studio turns deadly, the daughter of a renowned private investigator is her company's only hope—and the highlight of this debut mystery. Read full book review >

Firebrand by Aaron Barnhart
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An accessible, historically rigorous tale."
Barnhart (The Big Divide, 2013) offers a YA novel about faith and courage, inspired by the true story of an immigrant who joined Kansas' anti-slavery cause during the Civil War. Read full book review >
The Antichrist of Kokomo County by David Skinner
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A stylish novel from a fine comedic storyteller who hopefully has more than one book in him."
Skinner's debut novel is a clever, funny chronicle of an apocalypse narrowly averted and of greatness diverted. Read full book review >
Art in the Blood by Bonnie MacBird
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A worthy addition to the adventures of Sherlock Holmes."
In this debut mystery, famed detective Sherlock Holmes and partner Dr. Watson face a villain obsessed with procuring the recently discovered Marseille Nike. Read full book review >

Stones in the Road by E. B. Moore
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An appealing Amish twist on a classic narrative."
In a second Amish-themed novel, Moore (An Unseemly Wife, 2014) spins her grandfather's journey West into the rich tale of a prodigal son.Read full book review >
The Vivisection Mambo by Lolita Lark
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A fine anthology of some of the best contemporary poetry around."
Fresh new writers rub elbows with past masters in this scintillating collection of verse. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A political treatise that focuses on empowering readers with its ideas."
A political writer and former Democratic Party congressional candidate endeavors to galvanize America's liberal left by illustrating how the Republican Party has become a destructive force. Read full book review >
Emma G. Loves Boyz by Taro Meyer
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"Sweet but deafening, Emma's contagious enthusiasm amplifies this wholesome fan letter for younger readers."
The exuberant journal of a star-struck fan who vows to stop at nothing—even doing chores!—for a chance to see her favorite boy band perform live. Read full book review >
Lord Byron's Prophecy by Sean Eads
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A sometimes-engrossing, sometimes-overwrought journey to the soul's dark side."
The notorious Romantic poet spiritually presides over a modern-day fable of forbidden desire, apocalyptic foreboding, and campus melodrama. Read full book review >
Green Eyes by Michael Ampersant
Released: Sept. 30, 2015

"A somewhat entertaining, somewhat feckless, and definitely lubricious picaresque."
Tangled affairs and a murder plot hit a gay beachfront community in this rollicking, lightweight tale. Read full book review >
The Theta Prophecy by Chris Dietzel
Released: Sept. 28, 2015

"A terrifying glimpse at a believable future."
Dietzel (The Last Teacher, 2015, etc.) offers a chilling sci-fi novel about big government run amok in the future. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >