The Vivisection Mambo by Lolita Lark
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A fine anthology of some of the best contemporary poetry around."
Fresh new writers rub elbows with past masters in this scintillating collection of verse. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A political treatise that focuses on empowering readers with its ideas."
A political writer and former Democratic Party congressional candidate endeavors to galvanize America's liberal left by illustrating how the Republican Party has become a destructive force. Read full book review >

Emma G. Loves Boyz by Taro Meyer
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"Sweet but deafening, Emma's contagious enthusiasm amplifies this wholesome fan letter for younger readers."
The exuberant journal of a star-struck fan who vows to stop at nothing—even doing chores!—for a chance to see her favorite boy band perform live. Read full book review >
Lord Byron's Prophecy by Sean Eads
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A sometimes-engrossing, sometimes-overwrought journey to the soul's dark side."
The notorious Romantic poet spiritually presides over a modern-day fable of forbidden desire, apocalyptic foreboding, and campus melodrama. Read full book review >
Green Eyes by Michael Ampersant
Released: Sept. 30, 2015

"A somewhat entertaining, somewhat feckless, and definitely lubricious picaresque."
Tangled affairs and a murder plot hit a gay beachfront community in this rollicking, lightweight tale. Read full book review >

The Theta Prophecy by Chris Dietzel
Released: Sept. 28, 2015

"A terrifying glimpse at a believable future."
Dietzel (The Last Teacher, 2015, etc.) offers a chilling sci-fi novel about big government run amok in the future. Read full book review >
Those Bones at Goliad by Judith Austin Mills
Released: Sept. 27, 2015

"Texas history on a broad, complex scale."
A sweeping tale of 19th-century Texas. Read full book review >
Grendel's Mother by Susan Signe Morrison
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"An enchanting, poignant reimagining of Beowulf."
Morrison's (The Literature of Waste, 2015, etc.) historical novel explores the legend of Beowulf.Read full book review >
Blue Moon Luck by Linda Collison
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"A well-written novel that rushes through its second half; readers might want another 100 pages."
In the early 1980s, two aspiring musicians yearn to escape their sleepy West Virginia hometown in Collison's (Water Ghosts, 2015, etc.) short, lyrical novel.Read full book review >
The President Factor by Pat Obermeier
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"A timely caricature of the worst and the best of American politics."
Incisive political satire by television veteran and debut novelist Obermeier that features two banes of modern-day society—bipartisan posturing and reality television shows. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"An oral history that delves deeply into video stores and the film movement they nurtured."
Using interviews with a wide array of filmmakers, former Premiere editor Roston brings the magic of video stores to life.Read full book review >
A Blind Eye by Jane  Gorman
Released: Sept. 17, 2015

"An astutely crafted, action-packed read."
A murder mystery revolving around government corruption in Poland. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marie Lu
September 29, 2015

In the second installment of Marie Lu’s Young Elites series, The Rose Society, Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she and her sister flee Kenettra to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her. But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good, when her very existence depends on darkness? “The direction of this trilogy's conclusion is left refreshingly difficult to predict,” our reviewer writes. View video >