Maybe Mermaids & Robots are Lonely by Matthew Fogarty
Released: Sept. 16, 2016

"Energetic stories unveil limitless possibilities always within reach."
A collection offers tales populated by families, lovers, and pariahs who brave worlds both real and illusory. Read full book review >
Such Mad Fun by Robin R. Cutler
Released: Sept. 8, 2016

"A valuable, absorbing contribution to the history of women, golden-age Hollywood, and America's magazine culture of the 1930s and '40s."
A biography of Jane Hall, a writer for magazines and movies, traces the complicated, warring pressures of talent and the feminine mystique. Read full book review >

Beyond Monongah by Judith Hoover
Released: Sept. 8, 2016

"A clever, engaging, and heart-rending tale about a 1907 catastrophe in Appalachia."
A debut historical novel charts the buildup to and aftermath of the worst mining disaster in American history. Read full book review >
The Return of Sir Percival by S. Alexander O'Keefe
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An engaging and epic yarn that explores the history behind the magic of Camelot."
In the first volume of a saga chronicling the exploits of a knight of the Round Table, Sir Percival returns to Albion only to find that much has changed. Read full book review >
The Adventures of Gracie & MonkeyBear by C.S.  O'Kelly
Released: Sept. 5, 2016

"Young readers who love to pretend will see Gracie as a kindred spirit and look forward to future seasonal adventures in this planned kids' book series."
A girl and her dog rescue pretend dinosaurs, aliens, and whales in this debut ode to imaginative play by O'Kelly with illustrations by Farrell.Read full book review >

A Pilgrim for Freedom by Michael Novakovic
Released: Aug. 31, 2016

"A remarkable and gripping account of a boy fleeing a war-torn nation and eventually flourishing in America."
As the rumble of World War II draws closer, a young boy leaves behind his once-comfortable life in Split, Yugoslavia, to embark on a turbulent adventure. Read full book review >
God of the Internet by Lynn Lipinski
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A deadly and exhilarating game of cat and mouse that has all the makings of an engaging series about fighting terrorists."
Homeland Security agents rush to prevent large-scale cyberwarfare in this thriller. Read full book review >
Identity Crisis by H.E. Rodda
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A thoughtful tale of mistaken identity, fraud, sex, murder, and transcendent friendship."
The Prince and the Pauper gets turned on its head in this rags-to-riches thriller. Read full book review >
Ruined by Ruth Everhart
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Forthright, compassionate, and expertly crafted—everything readers should want from a memoir."
A memoir offers extensive reportage of a sexual assault and a reflection on the author's future course and evolving faith. Read full book review >
Try! Try! Try! by Lindsey Craig
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A lively and clever volume about the importance of tackling new activities; perfect for toddlers who are ready for a little plot with their pictures and for children who can proudly read aloud to a younger sibling."
An energetic boy tells his animal friends that they already know how to dance in this board book for very young readers by Craig (In Our Tree, 2016, etc.).Read full book review >
Oh So Quiet! by Lindsey Craig
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A charmingly clever ode to backyard camping and the fun of spending time in nature, with a good bit of humor rolled into its colorful illustrations."
Two scared campers encounter a frightening creature in Craig's (Farmyard Beat, 2012, etc.) picture book with illustrations from Dunkley(Twenty Poems for Boys, 2016, etc.).Read full book review >
Hagen's Curse by James Emmi
Released: July 26, 2016

"A many-layered delight."
A sensuous tale of power, customs, and change. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >