A well-wrought memoir that turns simple observations and memories into powerful illustrations of grief and illness.
A writer recounts the emotions and memories of losing her mother and battling cancer. Read full book review >
Too Hot to Moo by Karyn Henwood
Released: June 2, 2015

"Children will love Gracie's actions and expressions and will eagerly ask for rereads so they can chant along with the too-hot refrain."
What's a cow to do when her family gets a pool and she's left alone in her sunny field? Debut author Henwood's and veteran illustrator Lemaire's hilarious answer is a delightfully fun read-aloud. Read full book review >

Nightmares Unhinged by Joshua Viola
Released: Oct. 11, 2015

"A slew of gloriously disturbing, well-told tales to unnerve readers."
Viola (Luna One, 2014, etc.) amasses a series of blistering horror stories, including a few of his own, from authors who tell of vampires, demons, killers, and things better left hidden in the dark.Read full book review >
Faith, Doubt, Mystery by James J. Tracy
Released: Sept. 3, 2015

"A sympathetic but unflinchingly honest testament of indoctrination and embattled faith."
An affecting account of one man's experiences with the Catholic faith. Read full book review >
The Double Life of Laurence Oliphant by Bart Casey
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An engrossing portrait of an emblematic Victorian."
A rollicking biography of a classic 19th-century figure, featuring imperial adventure, high diplomacy, literary fame, and an eccentric cult focused on bizarrely sublimated sexuality. Read full book review >

Escape from Dorkville by Dean Ammerman
Released: Aug. 10, 2015

"Zany fun in an exciting adventure."
It falls upon 14-year-old Wilkin Delgado and his partner in crime, tug of war champion Alice Jane Zelinski, to save the universe again in the latest installment of Ammerman's (Waiting for the Voo, 2014, etc.) adventures.Read full book review >
Peanuts: A Tribute to Charles M. Schulz by Shannon Watters
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"An entertaining testament to the enduring richness of 'Peanuts' and the creativity it still inspires."
Celebrated cartoonists interpret the look, legacy, and worldview of the "Peanuts" comic strip in this vibrant homage to its creator.Read full book review >
Rising From the Mire by Christine Grace
Released: Oct. 23, 2015

"Affecting yet inspiring in its positivity."
This collection of insightful, emotionally intuitive short stories by Grace succeeds in honoring the resilience of women around the world. Read full book review >
The Improbable Wonders of  Moojie Littleman by Robin Gregory
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"A lively, original take on a story of a boy with more limits—and more magic—than most."
In this YA coming-of-age novel, a disabled boy goes to live on his grandfather's farm, meets a mysterious clan, and discovers special powers. Read full book review >
Crossroads by Christopher Conte
Released: June 3, 2015

"A strong collection of memoiristic writing that illuminates African womanhood while blending diverse styles and experiences."
Conte, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, collects 15 autobiographical essays by Ugandan women that question stereotypes of African femininity. Read full book review >
The Vermeer Conspiracy by Eytan Halaban
Released: April 17, 2015

"A fine thriller that's intriguing and clever, appreciative of art's power, and grounded in a sensitive humanity—a winner."
In this novel, a Yale student investigating her roommate's disappearance uncovers clues to a centuries-old art mystery and a shadowy group of art collectors. Read full book review >
The Girl on the Pier by Paul Tomkins
Released: Jan. 28, 2015

"Beautiful and chilling—a brilliant debut.
In Tomkins' (Dynasty: Fifty Years of Shankly's Liverpool, 2013, etc.) novel, a forensic artist's romantic obsessions and traumatic past rise to the surface as he works on a cold case.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >