Indie Book Reviews (page 10)

A Perfect Spy by Francis Hamit
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 12, 2015

"Clarity, humor, polished writing, and an engaging narrator make for an enjoyable read."
An Iowa college student discovers a new life filled with sex and adventure in this debut memoir by Hamit (Meltdown, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >
Montgomery Rabbit by Sandy Little
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 12, 2015

"A sweet, if slight, story about a rabbit's search for raspberries that relies too heavily on moral platitudes instead of character development."
A debut children's book that features an inquisitive animal and his colorful circle of friends. Read full book review >

The Man His Father Was by Pat Leonard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2015

"An uneven historical novel light on story, heavy on history."
This historical novel follows four generations of men through the events that shaped early America. Read full book review >
The Cat's Got My Tongue by Doctor Harmony
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 11, 2015

"A somewhat weaker series entry, but one that may still be useful for school libraries."
A girl suffers from a lack of self-confidence in this second installment of Harmony's (Kanga, My Dragon of Anger, 2015, etc.) series of rhyming books about children's common problems.Read full book review >
Jo, My Sad Hippo by Doctor Harmony
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 11, 2015

"A roughly rhymed picture book about sadness that may help some young children develop empathy."
Sal and Al return to discuss sadness in Harmony's third book about coping with emotions. Read full book review >

Journeys into the New World by Jay Prasad
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2015

"An epic, plodding saga jam-packed with historical specifics."
Prasad's second novel (Fabulous Voyage Across the Sea, 2010) explores Spain in the late 15th and early 16th centuries via the perspectives of three men, each of whom becomes involved with Christopher Columbus. Read full book review >
Under the Pong Pong Tree by Hal Levey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2015

"An expansive but stifled drama about the ravages of war."
A debut historical novel follows a young woman struggling in Singapore during and after the Japanese occupation and her abandoned daughter. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A fun, successful collection of concepts, thoughts, and strategies about maintaining joy and living creatively."
Debut author and educational administrator Popish offers innovative springboards, exercises, and tools for a more inspired life. Read full book review >
Up to the Mountains and Down to the Countryside by Quincy Carroll
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A short, insightful reflection on the expatriate experience."
Carroll's debut novel, a character study of two Americans teaching English in rural China, gracefully contrasts idealism and cynicism. Read full book review >
Dog Medicine by Julie Barton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A heartfelt page-turner about depression and how dogs can save us from ourselves."
In this moving debut autobiography, a chronically depressed short story writer tells how her relationship with her dog saved her life. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A book that effectively presents a realistic, flexible diet."
A Los Angeles physician and nutrition specialist offers customized eating plans based on individual goals and insulin status. Read full book review >
Evil Among Us by Kirk Spangler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A flawed but fast-paced novel that reads like a blockbuster action movie."
A mystery/thriller that's brimming with action. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >