Indie Book Reviews (page 10)

The Adventures of Maesee Peek by Janet Hébert
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2016

"An absolute delight, featuring a quirky, resourceful doll heroine."
In Hébert's illustrated debut children's book, a cloth doll with a special gold monocle, watch, and bustle gets lost and goes on adventures. Read full book review >
Said the Fly by Laurie Taylor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 2016

"A buzz-worthy initial offering in a planned mystery series."
A blowfly, a grasshopper leg, and a tiny flower are the unlikely clues that help a zoologist track down a killer in this dazzling island mystery. Read full book review >

Running In Circles by Mamta Prasad
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 2016

"These poems often address big themes with brio, but the collection as a whole covers well-trod territory and lacks consistency."
Prasad's debut collection of poetry and prose is a long rumination on love, language, life, and the universe, filled with bright, colorful paintings and photos. Read full book review >
Thar She Blows by James Ragsdale
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A confounding account of the author's life in horse racing."
In this hybrid work of spiritualism, memoir, and nonfiction, debut author Ragsdale takes the reader through his history with the sport of horse racing, from his younger years sneaking away from jobs for a few hours at the track to his later ownership of multiple thoroughbreds. Read full book review >
More Light on the Expanding Universe by Les Hardison
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 8, 2016

"More about a new theory of physics that challenges accepted science regarding the building blocks of the universe."
A further exploration of a theory of physics that reinterprets light through a new paradigm. Read full book review >

Shape, Shine and Shadow by John Benacre
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2016

"An IRA protagonist perhaps too smart for his pursuers, but the recurring character is always entertaining."
The failure of a resurgent Irish Republican Army-planned bombing in 2016 London puts an Irishman on the run from both MI5 and his boss in Benacre's (McCann, 2015, etc.) thriller. Read full book review >
Melting the Blues by Tracy McGhee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2016

"A brave, musical story rich with Southern history."
In McGhee's debut novel, an African-American musician learns that there are many ways to get the blues. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 4, 2016

"A coherent, comprehensive exploration of evolution, genetics, and what it means to be human."
A neuroscientist looks at evolution and the future of Homo sapiens.Read full book review >
Sacred Blood by Andres Amezquita
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 4, 2016

"A thriller that entertainingly traverses well-traveled territory."
A debut murder mystery that revolves around a long-standing history of secrecy at the Vatican. Read full book review >
The War of Words by Amy Neftzger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2016

"Engaging characters and an imaginative plot make for a satisfying read."
Neftzger's fantasy novel refreshes the conventions of the genre while meeting readers' expectations of it. Read full book review >
The Devil's Jukebox by J.D. Knight
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2016

"A protagonist whose nimbleness while facing danger is something to marvel at—and celebrate."
An ex-cop has only a week to track down a missing witness who may have an alibi for a death-row inmate in this thriller. Read full book review >
Train Station Park by Abby Diamond
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2016

"A good message about self-acceptance, backed by charming images."
In this illustrated book for young readers, an old train who feels useless is reminded that he can still make kids happy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >