Indie Book Reviews (page 2)

EXHUMING MARY MCCARTHY by Jessica Lamirand
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 2015

"A nostalgia-infused ode to youthful stumbles and joys."
Lamirand's memoir, a debut, recounts the friendships she formed during her first few years at Colorado College in the mid-'90s. Read full book review >
FLU SHOT GONE WRONG by Michelle Mouille
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 2015

"An unadorned, heart-wrenching, and timely true story."
Debut author Mouille writes a cautionary memoir about her son's severe reaction to a flu vaccine. Read full book review >

LOGOS by John Neeleman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 2015

"Especially for those interested in theological history, an extraordinary amalgam of fiction and fact."
A fictional account of the birth of Christianity. Read full book review >
THE FLIPSIDE by Kimbeth Wehrli Judge
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2015

"A dark, complex tale with very few winners."
Judge's (Mothers and Others: A Story Collection, 2014) new novel tells a story of addiction, betrayal, and death. Read full book review >
GIDEON'S CHILDREN by Howard G. Franklin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"A thriller with a unique story idea and a well-captured historical mood but hampered by one-dimensional characters."
An idealistic young public defender and his colleagues decide to stop plea-bargaining in Franklin's (An Irish Experience, 2008, etc.) historical novel.The year 1968 was a tumultuous time in America. Read full book review >

OUT OF SYNCH by Warren Firschein
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Though suffering from some craft problems, the novel stays afloat thanks to a winning protagonist and good pacing."
A light, mostly engaging middle-grade sports novel focused on the competitive world of synchronized swimming. Read full book review >
THE LEGACY OF LOST THINGS by Aida Zilelian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"A lyrical description of a family's search for their daughter and for their humanity."
Debut author Zilelian's story follows a family of Armenian immigrants struggling to adapt to the American way of life while also contending with traditional coming-of-age conflicts. Read full book review >
THE JOURNALS OF BOB DRIFTER by M.L.S. Weech
THRILLERS
Released: March 3, 2015

"An often engaging supernatural thriller with an immortal protagonist with meritorious human traits."
In Weech's debut supernatural thriller, an empathetic soul collector must stop one of his own from reaping dark souls and committing murder. Read full book review >
JUST PRU by Anne Pfeffer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 2, 2015

"Psychological seriousness adds depth to this romantic coming-of-age tale."
In this novel, an anxiety-ridden young woman finds new friends and inner resources after an apartment fire forces her to accept a neighbor's hospitality. Read full book review >
LUCIFER'S PROMISE by Alan Thompson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2015

"A complex, thought-provoking story that defies genre conventions to remind us of difficult questions and tangled answers."
Thompson's new novel is equal parts legal thriller, medical ethics conundrum and old-fashioned murder mystery. Read full book review >
Auschwitz #34207 by Nancy Sprowell Geise
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2015

"A riveting, well-documented account of survival that's harrowing, inspiring and unforgettable."
Debut biographer Geise (The Eighth Sea, 2012) tells the remarkable story of Joe Rubinstein, a survivor of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
VOICES by R.E. Rowe
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 27, 2015

"A well-written, if somewhat overambitious, YA tale."
Rowe's (Creatures of the Lake, 2011, etc.) genre-spanning YA novel features a romance between an ex-track star with a heart problem and a brilliant street artist who hears voices. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >