Indie Book Reviews (page 3)

Foundra: The Rift War by Emmanuel M. Arriaga
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 30, 2015

"Delightful genre piece with all the right ingredients: monsters, warfare, and romance."
In Arriaga's sci-fi debut, an elite military team tries to stop a vindictive enemy from a parallel universe hellbent on annihilating races and leaving planets in ruin. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 30, 2015

"A book that showcases and contributes to an African-American family's impressive record of achievement."
A Louisiana State University basketball player turned entrepreneur shares his principles for success in this debut memoir/motivational guide. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 30, 2015

"An engaging, though unpolished tale of an ice age migration."
An epic novel examines a possible prehistoric immigration to the Americas. Read full book review >
Girl of Myth and Legend by Giselle Simlett
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"An enjoyable, violent novel that delivers a strong-willed heroine and a brooding hero.
"
A determined teenager confronts a dystopian world and an unwanted destiny in this YA fantasy series opener. Read full book review >
Alpha Beta Zero to Zillion Word Codes for Numbers by Godwin Lekwuwa
Released: Dec. 28, 2015

"A number-remembering system that works, although mastering it may take some practice."
Debut author Lekwuwa delivers a guidebook about a system for remembering numbers. Read full book review >

Growing Up Twice by Aaron Kirk Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 28, 2015

"A moving memoir about struggling to form personal relationships in turbulent environments."
A 40-something Oregon man writes about his yearslong experience with the Big Brothers Big Sisters program in this debut. Read full book review >
Protecting Paige by Deby Eisenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 24, 2015

"A sentimental but moving family saga."
A young girl lives with her uncle after the tragic loss of her parents and helps him to seek love again. Read full book review >
 Transformative Enterprise Architecture  by Atul Apte
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 24, 2015

"A searching look into the evolving world of IT enterprises, despite unfortunately hyper-technical language.
"
An attempt to prepare organizations for a new business culture of rapid change. Read full book review >
Dark Horde Rising by Iain Hope
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 24, 2015

"Long on imagination and word count; not for the casual fan of fantasy."
From debut author Hope comes an epic fantasy novel about a group of friends, a college of magic, and a time of great disorder. Read full book review >
Mimadamos by Chadi Ghaith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 21, 2015

"Wild and meditative, this heady book delivers plenty of ideas, some large, some obvious."
A fantastical debut novel concerns the union of two supernatural entities. Read full book review >
The Stormwater Drains in Canberra by Paul Johan Karlsen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 21, 2015

"A frank, funny, immensely winning novel about a 'sex pioneer' exploring the hinterlands of desire."
A coming-of-age story metamorphoses into a global sexual odyssey. Read full book review >
Great Grandpa is Weird by Stephanie Bilovsky
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Dec. 20, 2015

"Filled with tender, teachable moments, this one's also sure to tickle the funny bone."
A young boy does not want to visit his "weird" great-grandfather. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >