Indie Book Reviews (page 4)

Peanuts: A Tribute to Charles M. Schulz by Shannon Watters
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"An entertaining testament to the enduring richness of 'Peanuts' and the creativity it still inspires."
Celebrated cartoonists interpret the look, legacy, and worldview of the "Peanuts" comic strip in this vibrant homage to its creator.Read full book review >
Never Before by Tamara Herman
Released: Oct. 17, 2015

"An unevenly written but often entertaining romantic story."
A young woman must open up and face her past when she meets the man of her dreams in this melodramatic debut romance. Read full book review >

The Hearts of Dragons by Josh VanBrakle
Released: Oct. 16, 2015

"A fantasy sequel with well-developed characters that doesn't disappoint."
In the second installment of this Japanese mythology-inspired fantasy series, Iren Saitosan, a member of a warrior race known as the Maantecs, sets out to regain his magic-using ability, uncovering many secrets about his past along the way. Read full book review >
In the Tree Top by Candide Jones
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"A warmhearted, eye-pleasing new 'Rock-a-Bye Baby' picture book in verse, nicely calibrated for cozy bedtime reading."
Using the well-loved "Rock-a-Bye Baby" lyrics as their springboard, a writer/editor with a literary-press background and her collaborator, an accomplished watercolorist, have created a pretty new picture book shaped around reassuring verses. Read full book review >
Busker's Holiday by Adam Gussow
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"A strongly written, cool novel about being young, bluesy, and free on a vagabond adventure in Europe."
In Gussow's (Mister Satan's Apprentice: A Blues Memoir, 2009) lively road novel, an American grad student spends a wild few weeks as a street musician in Europe. Read full book review >

Parchment by Wes Davies
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"Despite some pacing issues, a promising start to a new series."
Three young siblings find themselves transported back in time to the 1453 fall of Constantinople at the hands of the Ottoman Empire in the first entry in Davies' YA saga. Read full book review >
Sock Monster by Stacey R. Campbell
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"An unexpected twist and wacky, well-rendered illustrations keep this simple picture book from skewing a bit preachy and dark, despite its clean-your-room lesson."
In this mildly scary, funny picture book, a mom's bedtime-story ploy encourages her little boy to clean up his messy room or risk attracting the attention of a hungry "sock monster." Read full book review >
Sleep Secrets by Ronald M. Bazar
Released: Oct. 14, 2015

"A layperson's guide to possible impediments to successful sleep, including a variety of natural cures that lack strong scientific backing."
A guide to overcoming sleep problems, offering solutions that range from the ordinary to the esoteric. Read full book review >
The Mouse That Saved Christmas by Douglas Macdonald
Released: Oct. 14, 2015

"A charming Christmas story that proves that even the smallest creatures can play a big role in saving the day."
A bilingual English/Spanish Christmas story about a small mouse who makes a big difference. Read full book review >
Better Human by Ronda Conger
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Easy-reading thoughts to ponder in an eye-catching design."
In her energetic self-help debut, Conger offers familiar ideas for personal improvement and success. Read full book review >
Nightmares Unhinged by Joshua Viola
Released: Oct. 11, 2015

"A slew of gloriously disturbing, well-told tales to unnerve readers."
Viola (Luna One, 2014, etc.) amasses a series of blistering horror stories, including a few of his own, from authors who tell of vampires, demons, killers, and things better left hidden in the dark.Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 9, 2015

"A smartly observed, important work by an IT expert with a keen eye on the future."
A timely, insightful exploration of the transformational change occurring in information technology. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >