Indie Book Reviews (page 4)

OUT OF SYNCH by Warren Firschein
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Though suffering from some craft problems, the novel stays afloat thanks to a winning protagonist and good pacing."
A light, mostly engaging middle-grade sports novel focused on the competitive world of synchronized swimming. Read full book review >
THE LEGACY OF LOST THINGS by Aida Zilelian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"A lyrical description of a family's search for their daughter and for their humanity."
Debut author Zilelian's story follows a family of Armenian immigrants struggling to adapt to the American way of life while also contending with traditional coming-of-age conflicts. Read full book review >

THE JOURNALS OF BOB DRIFTER by M.L.S. Weech
THRILLERS
Released: March 3, 2015

"An often engaging supernatural thriller with an immortal protagonist with meritorious human traits."
In Weech's debut supernatural thriller, an empathetic soul collector must stop one of his own from reaping dark souls and committing murder. Read full book review >
The Realm of Misplaced Hearts by Rick Hobbs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"An intelligent, lively thriller."
Hobbs' (Entangled Realms, 2013) follow-up novel explores the life of a girl with a genius intellect and other remarkable gifts that some would kill to attain. Read full book review >
JUST PRU by Anne Pfeffer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 2, 2015

"Psychological seriousness adds depth to this romantic coming-of-age tale."
In this novel, an anxiety-ridden young woman finds new friends and inner resources after an apartment fire forces her to accept a neighbor's hospitality. Read full book review >

Project GITMO: Resolution by Daniel J. Rich
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 2, 2015

"Fast, action-packed fantasy-adventure that's not too demanding."
In the second book of Rich's series, Airman Aaron Craymer is part of a strange and deadly group of soldiers: a black ops unit of vampires trained by the U.S. government. Read full book review >
LUCIFER'S PROMISE by Alan Thompson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2015

"A complex, thought-provoking story that defies genre conventions to remind us of difficult questions and tangled answers."
Thompson's new novel is equal parts legal thriller, medical ethics conundrum and old-fashioned murder mystery. Read full book review >
THE EVOLUTION OF ROBERT CARR by Paul K Lovett
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2015

"A somewhat uneven sci-fi tale that admirably handles weighty philosophical concepts with a light touch."
In Lovett's debut sci-fi satire, a young man's technological upgrade doesn't go as expected. Read full book review >
Auschwitz #34207 by Nancy Sprowell Geise
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2015

"A riveting, well-documented account of survival that's harrowing, inspiring and unforgettable."
Debut biographer Geise (The Eighth Sea, 2012) tells the remarkable story of Joe Rubinstein, a survivor of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2015

"The dumbed-down science with humor works well, but by discounting the dignity of man and his spiritual nature, the book may lose some spiritually inclined readers."
Humorist and computer expert Hicken debuts with an entertaining view of the origins of the universe, humankind, and the role of self. Read full book review >
VOICES by R.E. Rowe
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 27, 2015

"A well-written, if somewhat overambitious, YA tale."
Rowe's (Creatures of the Lake, 2011, etc.) genre-spanning YA novel features a romance between an ex-track star with a heart problem and a brilliant street artist who hears voices. Read full book review >
ROCKY POINT ROAD by Joseph Allen
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 27, 2015

"At a decidedly unhurried pace, this story's enlivened by its colorful characters."
In Allen's debut thriller, the drowning death of a man's estranged wife may not have been accidental. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >