Indie Book Reviews (page 5)

The Agathon by Colin Weldon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 11, 2015

"A compelling sci-fi series that starts with a big bang."
The unexpected, unexplained destruction of Earth sends an experimental faster-than-light starship careening into the cosmos on a desperate mission to save what's left of humanity. Read full book review >
The Las Vegas Madam by Jami Rodman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 10, 2015

"Not always sure of its own stance on escorts, this book still offers an effective behind-the-scenes tour."
A debut memoir describes how a small-town Christian girl ends up running a Las Vegas escort agency, charging up to $1,500 an hour. Read full book review >

Four Ways to Pharaoh Khufu by Alexander Marmer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 10, 2015

"A well-researched take on the pyramids' creation successfully disguised as a smart thriller."
Marmer's debut novel explores the many secrets of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Read full book review >
My Father's Son by John Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A snappy, sensitive autobiography."
In this well-crafted debut memoir, Davis recounts his early life with an angry, drug-dealing father and comes to terms with the fact of his adoption. Read full book review >
Rude Boy USA by Victoria Bolton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A scattershot story, but one that manages to deliver a historically edifying depiction of the 1960s."
A debut tale of organized crime, political unrest, and love in New York City during the 1960s. Read full book review >

The Double Life of Laurence Oliphant by Bart Casey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An engrossing portrait of an emblematic Victorian."
A rollicking biography of a classic 19th-century figure, featuring imperial adventure, high diplomacy, literary fame, and an eccentric cult focused on bizarrely sublimated sexuality. Read full book review >
Twisted Reunion by Mark Tullius
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"Time-honored frights with innovation infused throughout.
"
Deranged killers and creatures veiled in darkness inhabit the somber pages of this horror story collection. Read full book review >
The PREAH Secrets by K. B. Beaumaaks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A titillating but tangled scandal."
Beaumaaks' debut combines money, sex, and double-dealing in the unlikely setting of an animal hospital. Read full book review >
The Firebrand Legacy by T.K. Kiser
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A rousing saga of magic and mystery that leaves the door wide open for a sequel and more."
Magic is both friend and foe in Kiser's debut YA fantasy. Read full book review >
 Economic Conservative/Social Liberal  by Mark Bragg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A vibrant attempt to articulate a grand compromise between the American left and right."
A list of political cures for what ails the United States, offered in a spirit of bipartisanship. Read full book review >
BOOBS by Simon Plaster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A zany, if sometimes-excessive, novel that makes a mockery of many topical issues."
Plaster (Ticks, 2014, etc.) offers a satirical novel about political correctness in America.Read full book review >
The Orphan of Mecca by Harvey Havel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A suspenseful romance between a Hindu and a Muslim, and a nerve-racking historical tale."
An ambitious novel presents a tragic story of love and strife during Bangladesh's Liberation War. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >