Indie Book Reviews (page 6)

Birds of Passage by Joe Giordano
Released: Oct. 8, 2015

"A refreshing rethink of the archetypal mafia novel."
This riveting debut novel by Giordano charts the passage of two young Italian men to early twentieth century New York, as they strive to make their mark in the New World. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 7, 2015

"A smart caper with a heroine to match."
When her new job at a movie studio turns deadly, the daughter of a renowned private investigator is her company's only hope—and the highlight of this debut mystery. Read full book review >

Yiayia Visits Amalia by Maria G. Mackavey
Released: Oct. 7, 2015

"A wonderful, well-illustrated look at the relationship between a grandparent and granddaughter who live miles apart."
A grandmother navigates the route from the suburbs to the big city in this book about travel, kindness, and love by Mackavey (The Artist and the Lava Beast, 2013), with illustrations from Johnson.Read full book review >
Firebrand by Aaron Barnhart
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An accessible, historically rigorous tale."
Barnhart (The Big Divide, 2013) offers a YA novel about faith and courage, inspired by the true story of an immigrant who joined Kansas' anti-slavery cause during the Civil War. Read full book review >
The Antichrist of Kokomo County by David Skinner
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A stylish novel from a fine comedic storyteller who hopefully has more than one book in him."
Skinner's debut novel is a clever, funny chronicle of an apocalypse narrowly averted and of greatness diverted. Read full book review >

Art in the Blood by Bonnie MacBird
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A worthy addition to the adventures of Sherlock Holmes."
In this debut mystery, famed detective Sherlock Holmes and partner Dr. Watson face a villain obsessed with procuring the recently discovered Marseille Nike. Read full book review >
Stones in the Road by E. B. Moore
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An appealing Amish twist on a classic narrative."
In a second Amish-themed novel, Moore (An Unseemly Wife, 2014) spins her grandfather's journey West into the rich tale of a prodigal son.Read full book review >
Climbing the Rain by Howard Cincotta
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Tree-hugging sci-fi—familiar stuff that still grows on you."
Forced to accompany a commercial expedition to a dangerous, distant planet, business negotiator Leyden finds himself caught in civil strife, intrigue, and romance within a tree-dwelling primitive culture. Read full book review >
Bouncing Forward by Michaela Haas
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An often masterful hybrid of self-help and firsthand history."
Haas (Dakini Power, 2013) offers a combination of science reportage, memoir, and advice on the subject of trauma.Read full book review >
Monsterland by Michael Phillip Cash
Released: Oct. 3, 2015

"A signature Cash creation, full of both mayhem and heart."
From the author of Pokergeist (2015) comes a tale of teenagers at a theme park featuring actual zombies, vampires, and werewolves.Read full book review >
Tales for the Train by J. John le Grange
Released: Oct. 2, 2015

"Pain, loneliness, humiliation, and grief underlie these atomized, broken lives."
The nine interconnected stories in this novella, set in a small Japanese town, center on a suicide. Read full book review >
The Vivisection Mambo by Lolita Lark
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A fine anthology of some of the best contemporary poetry around."
Fresh new writers rub elbows with past masters in this scintillating collection of verse. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >