Indie Book Reviews (page 647)

HOLIDAY IN SLUGLAND by Maureen O'Beirne
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 26, 2011

"A calm tale of vacationing insects set in a cleverly imagined world that may entertain young readers."
The tiny world of Slugland, complete with butterfly waitresses, caterpillar chefs and dragonfly train engineers, comes alive in author and illustrator O'Beirne's reissue of her 2006 chapter book. Read full book review >
MORSELS OF REFLECTION by Rosanna Figna
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 26, 2011

"A witty, deft compilation of curated observations."
An exploration of the aphorism, a time-honored literary form that has delighted audiences for centuries. Read full book review >

FERRET GIRL by Colin Haskin
Released: July 26, 2011

"An absolutely wonderful debut with the potential to become a YA classic."
In a modern take on both Kafka and T.H. White, a young girl learns about life as a human by spending time in her pet ferret's world. Read full book review >
COYOTE HEALER, COYOTE CURANDERO by Mariana Ruybalid
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 26, 2011

"Packed with action and ideas, but stylistically invariable."
Personal and social progress are intertwined in Ruybalid's (A Pattern of Silent Tears, 2011) vision of a dystopian future. Read full book review >
Released: July 26, 2011

"An impressive foray into the inner workings of modern civilization—and how it might yet be saved from itself."
An awkward, somewhat New Age-y title doesn't begin to adequately serve this thorough analysis of human civilization and its primordial flaws. Read full book review >

DEVIL’S HAND by M.E. Patterson
THRILLERS
Released: July 25, 2011

"A fast-paced fight against demonic forces that will appeal to lovers of supernatural thrillers."
A down-on-his-luck gambler gets more than he bargained for in this supernatural thriller from Patterson. Read full book review >
Released: July 25, 2011

"Lively, illuminatingly exotic and richly told tale of life during wartime."
Groves' debut historical novel, set in mid-20th-century Japan, is a well-tempered story of cultural dislocation, the ruin of war and faith in love. Read full book review >
Released: July 24, 2011

"A highly intimate rendering of one person's attempt at religious insight."
Carty presents a collection of Christian poems. Read full book review >
THE LESSER GODS by K.D. Azariah-Kribbs
Released: July 24, 2011

"A rollicking, provocative read that hits a few speed bumps."
Man was thrown from paradise to suffer and die, but he took a book with him; now modern-day terrorists and the Vatican are willing to kill to possess it. Read full book review >
Released: July 23, 2011

"Lyrically descriptive and unabashedly steampunk; the first of what promises to be a rewarding series of novels."
An urchin, a prince and the prince's guards protect Victorian England from a threat to its monarchy in this debut novel. Read full book review >
VIEWS FROM THE MAINLAND by Joe Brennan
Released: July 23, 2011

"A lengthy but thorough and valuable treatment of living in China."
An American records his daily experiences as an English teacher in China. Read full book review >
Released: July 23, 2011

"Folks new to the game will find Gratt's guidebook an accessible, reasonable entry point."
Gratt's beginner's guide to high-stakes poker is chock-full of basic know-how. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >