Indie Book Reviews (page 647)

FORETELLER by Anne McAneny
Released: March 7, 2012

"Will appeal especially to readers who like a pinch of the paranormal with their suspense."
In McAneny's debut thriller, a smart, snarky archaeologist digs up clues surrounding her mother's death. Read full book review >
LOOKING UPWARD by Olivia Charters
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 7, 2012

"The curious, thoughtful Rabbit encourages kids to look up at the sky and dream."
A rabbit discovers a world of color, love, knowledge and mysteries in Charters' debut.Read full book review >

Released: March 7, 2012

"A powerful story that approaches a happy ending—or at least a hopeful one."
A novel about one man's struggle with alcoholism and anxiety after hitting rock bottom. Read full book review >
Released: March 7, 2012

"A sustained, well-reasoned argument that biblical viewpoints unsubstantiated by scientific proof should be discarded as superstition."
Silvers' extended essay examines the complex relationship between biblical and scientific perspectives. Read full book review >
CLASSICAL CLASSICS by Ed Nielsen
Released: March 7, 2012

"For readers seeking an introduction to classical music, an easy, entertaining alternative to searching online."
A personable if anachronistic beginner's guide to classical music. Read full book review >

THE LAST SHIPWRECKED SAILOR by Joseph Ezzo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 2012

"Imaginative and ambitious, but this epic requires great patience."
In Ezzo's first series of novels, folkloric tales and unsettling violence suffuse a contemporary sea journey. Read full book review >
Released: March 7, 2012

"A short, candid book that urges girls to pursue their dreams."
In Johnson's debut picture book, a father encourages his daughter to reach for the stars. Read full book review >
Released: March 7, 2012

"Fiery self-indulgence glowing in the darkness."
Martinez's debut volume of poetry introduces his alter ego, WolfSaint. Read full book review >
Released: March 7, 2012

"This unusually thoughtful, considered memoir will be valuable and inspirational to readers who have lost a loved one to suicide."
Maxwell (Eighteen Roses Red, 2006, etc.) revisits her son's suicide and her subsequent grieving process. Read full book review >
THE TINSMITH by Tim Bowling
Released: March 6, 2012

"A dynamic, dazzling yarn."
A haunting tale of quiet courage and friendship in the face of racism, corruption and cruelty that runs from the Battle of Antietam to a remote fishing village in British Columbia. Read full book review >
THE UNKINDNESS OF STRANGERS by Peter S. Fischer
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 6, 2012

"An engaging old-Hollywood whodunit."
In the latest installment of Fischer's (Pray for Us Sinners, 2013, etc.) Hollywood Murder Mysteries series, public relations man Joe Bernardi investigates a murder in Malibu. Read full book review >
THE SEVEN PERFUMES OF SACRIFICE by Amy Logan
Released: March 5, 2012

"From the first page, Logan's thrilling debut novel is an intelligent, intricately layered adventure."
Logan's debut thriller follows an investigative journalist as she sets out to avenge the honor killing of a Druze friend. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >