Indie Book Reviews (page 7)

Bad Napkin by T.S.W. Sharman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"A zany and satisfying story for fans of YA tales that pack as much humor as they do heart."
A grand misunderstanding disrupts the lives of high school sweethearts in this YA novel. Read full book review >
The Best of Both Worlds by C.A.  O'Donnell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2016

"More cute than romantic, this love story should appeal to young teens."
A businessman's psychotically jealous ex-girlfriend threatens a tender relationship. Read full book review >

Tell Me No Lies by Magnolia Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2016

"An entertaining mashup of Bond, beignets, and bondage."
A CIA hit man struggles to protect a woman from a revenge killer—and his own dark desires—in this debut erotic thriller. Read full book review >
Kingdom's End by Charles D. Blanchard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2016

"A depressing read, despite an ending that offers some triumph."
In Blanchard's (Mourning Doves After the Fire, 2010) fantasy novel, a large rat colony is ruled by a good king until a rat soldier usurps power and the city hires exterminators. Read full book review >
Improve Your Odds by Alan Yong
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 15, 2016

"A clearly worded handbook for covering the business basics."
A debut guide offers a systematic plan for entrepreneurs to improve their companies. Read full book review >

Part of the Family by Jason Hensley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 14, 2016

"An invaluable illumination of small acts of astonishing bravery and generosity in the darkest days of war."
A compassionate, detailed account of a little-known corner of World War II history. Read full book review >
White Piano, Black Piano, Brown Piano by Paul Francis Malamud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 2016

"This book's portrayal of childhood exuberance and petulance, vivid characters, and Eddie's ephemeral sense of melancholy should keep readers hooked until the end."
Young Eddie Steinberg, growing up in 1950s Corvallis, Oregon, visits his maternal grandparents in Los Angeles in this child's-eye view of the world of adults. Read full book review >
Revising Genesis by James Quatro
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"An accessible, but serious new contribution to biblical studies."
A debut volume delivers a provocative reconsideration of the book of Genesis in light of modern science. Read full book review >
Touch of Iron by Timandra Whitecastle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 13, 2016

"Realistic, character-driven fantasy that manages to both sever limbs and warm the heart."
In this dark YA fantasy debut, teenage twins are swept up in a prince's quest for a legendary blade. Read full book review >
A New Science by Mukesh Prasad
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"While exploring a rich variety of topics, from climate change to Einstein, this collection of scientific thoughts lacks polish."
A scientific freethinker draws on his Usenet posts to argue for reinterpretations of mainstream theories. Read full book review >
Baby Steps by John Rollo
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2016

"Rollo spins a truly nightmarish medical ordeal into a life-affirming exercise in resilience, optimism, and eternal gratitude."
An inspired, epistolary debut memoir chronicling an amputee's months of rehabilitation and recovery. Read full book review >
All Good Children by Dayna Ingram
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 13, 2016

"An absorbing and poignant YA dystopian fantasy with a convincing heroine."
A teenager works through her emotional turmoil while waiting to become a sacrificial offering to aliens in this sci-fi melodrama. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

From Morgan Matson, the bestselling author of Since You’ve Been Gone, comes The Unexpected Everything, a feel-good YA novel of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >