Indie Book Reviews (page 7)

The Best of Both Worlds by C.A.  O'Donnell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2016

"More cute than romantic, this love story should appeal to young teens."
A businessman's psychotically jealous ex-girlfriend threatens a tender relationship. Read full book review >
Tell Me No Lies by Magnolia Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2016

"An entertaining mashup of Bond, beignets, and bondage."
A CIA hit man struggles to protect a woman from a revenge killer—and his own dark desires—in this debut erotic thriller. Read full book review >

Kingdom's End by Charles D. Blanchard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2016

"A depressing read, despite an ending that offers some triumph."
In Blanchard's (Mourning Doves After the Fire, 2010) fantasy novel, a large rat colony is ruled by a good king until a rat soldier usurps power and the city hires exterminators. Read full book review >
Improve Your Odds by Alan Yong
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 15, 2016

"A clearly worded handbook for covering the business basics."
A debut guide offers a systematic plan for entrepreneurs to improve their companies. Read full book review >
Part of the Family by Jason Hensley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 14, 2016

"An invaluable illumination of small acts of astonishing bravery and generosity in the darkest days of war."
A compassionate, detailed account of a little-known corner of World War II history. Read full book review >

White Piano, Black Piano, Brown Piano by Paul Francis Malamud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 2016

"This book's portrayal of childhood exuberance and petulance, vivid characters, and Eddie's ephemeral sense of melancholy should keep readers hooked until the end."
Young Eddie Steinberg, growing up in 1950s Corvallis, Oregon, visits his maternal grandparents in Los Angeles in this child's-eye view of the world of adults. Read full book review >
Revising Genesis by James Quatro
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"An accessible, but serious new contribution to biblical studies."
A debut volume delivers a provocative reconsideration of the book of Genesis in light of modern science. Read full book review >
Touch of Iron by Timandra Whitecastle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 13, 2016

"Realistic, character-driven fantasy that manages to both sever limbs and warm the heart."
In this dark YA fantasy debut, teenage twins are swept up in a prince's quest for a legendary blade. Read full book review >
A New Science by Mukesh Prasad
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"While exploring a rich variety of topics, from climate change to Einstein, this collection of scientific thoughts lacks polish."
A scientific freethinker draws on his Usenet posts to argue for reinterpretations of mainstream theories. Read full book review >
Baby Steps by John Rollo
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2016

"Rollo spins a truly nightmarish medical ordeal into a life-affirming exercise in resilience, optimism, and eternal gratitude."
An inspired, epistolary debut memoir chronicling an amputee's months of rehabilitation and recovery. Read full book review >
All Good Children by Dayna Ingram
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 13, 2016

"An absorbing and poignant YA dystopian fantasy with a convincing heroine."
A teenager works through her emotional turmoil while waiting to become a sacrificial offering to aliens in this sci-fi melodrama. Read full book review >
Peter Thiel by Richard Byrne Reilly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2016

"A short, scattered introduction to Thiel's worldview in his own words."
A compilation of entrepreneur Peter Thiel's thoughts on seemingly everyone and everything. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >