Indie Book Reviews (page 7)

Harvest of War by Jan Smolders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 2015

"A historically fascinating dramatization of wartime tyranny in Belgium."
A World War II novel examines a small Flemish town coping with the Nazi occupation. Read full book review >
Glamourville by Eric Coyote
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 28, 2015

"A harsh film-industry coming-of-age story."
Coyote (Invaders from the Outer Rim, 2015, etc.) delivers a novel about a young man making his way in Hollywood. Read full book review >

Einstein's Lost Key by Alexander Unzicker
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 28, 2015

"A passionate but disconnected treatise whose adversarial tone makes for an ultimately unpleasant reading experience."
A physicist argues for one of Albert Einstein's abandoned ideas in this defense of a road less traveled. Read full book review >
ProxyWar by DS Kane
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 27, 2015

"The latest adventure in a series that only grows more engaging with each installment."
In the sixth book in Kane's (Baksheesh Bribes, 2015, etc.) Spies Lie series, a motley crew of spies, hackers, and mercenaries unite to stop China and Russia from declaring war on the United States.Read full book review >
Fairalon by T.J. Roberts
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 27, 2015

"An often satisfying novel for young readers that hits most of the right notes."
An effervescent middle-grade fantasy story about accepting oneself and others. Read full book review >

Exes and O's by Lakeshia Poole
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 26, 2015

"An emotionally satisfying story of two college students finding love amid chaos."
A sequel offers an ongoing melodrama set on a university campus. Read full book review >
Fractures by Will James
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 26, 2015

"A beautiful dose of carnal mayhem set in Purgatory."
This debut fantasy thriller finds an assassin taken out of the killing game only to be thrust into a surreal plot to dethrone a deity. Read full book review >
DNA of Mathematics by Mehran Basti
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"Despite occasional nuggets of intrigue, wildly uneven and simply too disorganized to hold much interest or credibility."
Debut author Basti, a mathematician, explains the wide-ranging significance of Riccati differential equations frequently used in studies of motion in physics and engineering. Read full book review >
Killing Juggernaut by Jared Bernard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"Despite an overall lack of focus, Bernard's tale still manages to retain a mournful, prophetic power."
It's the end of the world as we know it, and nobody feels fine in Bernard's debut portrayal of humanity's end. Read full book review >
Walker The Goose by Susanne Blumer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"An appealing tale of good things coming to geese who wait."
A goose longs for a place to belong in this rhyming, based-on-a-true-story picture book from Blumer (Wooly Meets the Chickens, 2015). Read full book review >
MAROON RISING by John H. Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"Breezy, winsome, and endlessly diverting."
In the latest installment of Cunningham's (Second Chance Gold, 2014, etc.) adventure series, Buck Reilly dodges bullets and faces off against kidnappers while searching for Jamaican treasure.Read full book review >
Escaping Elsewhere by Raea Gragg
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"A lively, smart novel for teens and imaginative adults alike."
In this fantastical novel, a teen is stolen from her home and taken to a place called Elsewhere, where nothing is as it seems. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >