Indie Book Reviews (page 8)

SPINNER by Michael J. Bowler
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"An overstuffed horror story, but one that will both warm the heart and chill the spine."
Bowler's (And the Children Shall Lead, 2014, etc.) YA novel pits brave, resourceful special needs teenagers against a whole shelf's worth of supernatural scares. Read full book review >
Cape Deception by Eugene Nordstrom
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"A top-notch mystery with ever escalating suspense and a satisfying payoff."
Old money is the target of a calculating stalker in this engrossing thriller. Read full book review >

Daughters of Frankenstein by Steve Berman
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"A lively and engrossing collection of female-driven fiction."
Berman (Red Caps: New Fairy Tales for Out of the Ordinary Readers, 2014, etc.) edits an anthology of sci-fi and horror from queer perspectives. Read full book review >
Jewish American  Prig by Edith Stone
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"Impossible chronology adds the wrong kind of puzzlement to an otherwise overfamiliar plot."
In Stone's debut novel, a middle-aged woman reflects on her lifelong struggles toward self-esteem, sexual openness, and healthy relationships. Read full book review >
Justice for Mackenzie by Susan Stoker
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"More romance than thriller but enough of both to make this breezy read pure entertainment."
A Texas Ranger's newly discovered romance may be threatened by a serial killer who buries women alive in Stoker's (Protecting Jessyka, 2015, etc.) thriller, the first in a series. Read full book review >

Bibi & Babu in Africa by Bonnie  Toews
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"An approachable grandparent voice guides students interested in African animals, mountain climbing, and travel, with great pictures to match. "
Recalling their trip to Tanzania, two grandparents offer photos and a collection of facts about animals on safari, climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, and the plight of Tanzanian orphans. Read full book review >
Last Confession by D.C. Walker
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Men of God susceptible to human mistakes; profound, stimulating, and, best of all, entertaining."
In Walker (When the River Rises, 2015, etc.) and Dunbar's (Dungeons & Dragons: Legends of Baldur's Gate, Vol. 1, 2015, etc.) graphic novel/thriller, priests hoping to save a parish find a less than legitimate way to get the money, only to stir up a whirlwind of misdeeds and bad decisions. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Warm, witty recollections well-aware of their absurdity."
Absurdity and drama go hand in hand in Baysden's witty, loopy memoir of his time as a Navy adviser during the Vietnam War. Read full book review >
The Owl from Oblivion by Rusty Biesele
Released: Aug. 3, 2015

"A choppy fifth installment featuring philosophical musings and a cheekily optimistic conclusion."
Biesele's (The Saeshell Book of Time Part 4: The Ceremony of Life, 2014, etc.)latest Saeshell book is his most tangled tale to date.Read full book review >
Sharky Marky and the Scavenger Hunt by Lance Olsen
Released: Aug. 3, 2015

"An undersea adventure that both wins and loses."
Olsen and Perry (Sharky Marky and the Big Race, 2015) introduce the alphabet in the second installment of the Sharky Marky picture-book series. Read full book review >
Cut Paste Gone by Lisa  Safran
Released: Aug. 2, 2015

"A well-written, engaging exploration of the maxim, 'Be careful what you wish for.'"
A young girl with a magic pair of scissors makes a collage out of reality in Safran's debut YA novel. Read full book review >
Life's Too Short for Leftovers by Michael Ditchfield
Released: Aug. 1, 2015

"A series of moving, important stories from a passionate humanitarian that's sometimes overshadowed by its clever concept."
A humanitarian and amateur chef reflects on Africa, cooking, and what he's learned from those two passions. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >