Indie Book Reviews (page 9)

In Your Name, I Write by Claire Fukouara
Released: Jan. 10, 2015

"A dense, abstract philosophical work for the very patient and the very curious."
Fukouara expounds on common philosophical concepts in her debut work. Read full book review >
THE ANGEL OF ANTIOCH by Daniel Molyneux
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 10, 2015

"A theologically intriguing novel that mimics the Bible's dramatic presentation."
A parablelike tale of spirituality, religion, and persecution. Read full book review >

The Ballad of David and Israel by Roderick Byron Palmer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2015

"Searing action and drama, but truly a story of friends whose impacts on one another are profound and permanent."
In Palmer's urban drama debut, the close friendship between two California teens forever intertwines their lives and culminates in violence. Read full book review >
Naked Soul by Salil Jha
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2015

"Erotic poetry that evokes feelings of joy, happiness, and an overall celebration of the arts of physical and romantic love."
Jha's collection of concise, warm, and erotic poetry explores the delights of physical love from (primarily heterosexual) male and female perspectives. Read full book review >
THE ROBUSTA INCIDENT by Jennifer Fales
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2015

"Even though it dwells too often on its protagonist's misery, this book will appeal to anyone who's ever endured petty bureaucracy."
A novel packed with humor and absurd plot twists that satirizes corporate scientists and soulless management. Read full book review >

REACTION TO MURDER by David Veale
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 7, 2015

"A subdued but effective thriller that provides an ideal starting point for its exemplary protagonist.
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In Veale's debut procedural thriller, a burned and beaten body is found in the wreckage of a devastating fire at a U.K. college. Read full book review >
Fribbet the Frog and the Tadpoles by Carole P. Roman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 7, 2015

"Another strong installment in the Captain No Beard series despite quieter action and the obvious educational bend."
Captain No Beard and his loyal crew hit the high seas amid tears, change, and friendship in Roman's (Captain No Beard and the Aurora Borealis, 2014) newest pirate picture book. Read full book review >
CONSTANT IS THE RAIN by Rex Sexton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 2015

"The bleakness may be hard to take, but Sexton's talent for social commentary and character sketching marks him as—in a title he gives a character in 'Chop Suey'—'the Modigliani of the Mean Streets.'"
Relentless pessimism about the state of the nation infuses Sexton's (Paper Moon, 2013) accomplished poetry and short fiction about down-and-out drifters and starving artists. Read full book review >
FOREWARNED by Harry Gossett
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 7, 2015

"Any detective who can manage this many jobs in one story is practically begging for a series. Here's hoping."
In Gossett's (A Year in Fear, 2013) latest thriller, an investigator who's lost his PI license puts his sleuthing skills to work while eluding the IRS. Read full book review >
A GIRL'S GUIDE TO LIFE by Michelle Herman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"A sweet, if occasionally hackneyed, book of advice for young girls."
A mother's collection of bromides to her young daughter that centers on healthy emotional growth. Read full book review >
ATLANTIS RISING by Gloria Craw
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"An enchanting debut from a promising new author of paranormal YA."
In Craw's YA fantasy debut, a teenage girl discovers she's part of a magical race—and she may be key to saving humankind. Read full book review >
DEAD BALANCE by Gary Wayne Clark
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"A promising start to what could be a fresh paranormal-crime series, if plotting and characterization improve."
A crime novel set in the Colorado backcountry, mixing gritty suspense, supernatural horror, and Native American folklore. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >