Indie Book Reviews (page 9)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2016

"A beautiful, meditative account of literary and historical merit.
"
A debut memoir about adversity, identity, and a mystical quest for spiritual succor. Read full book review >
Persistence, Then Peace  by Tom Mach
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2016

"A charming, but bumpy recollection of a writer's love of his work."
A memoir recounts a life of tribulations and wordsmithery. Read full book review >

Vets For Vets by Gerald Alpern
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 5, 2016

"A compassionate and eye-opening approach to healing mentally and emotionally wounded soldiers."
A revolutionary look at methods to treat veterans in distress. Read full book review >
The Role by Richard Taylor Pearson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 4, 2016

"A lightweight, entertaining Broadway yarn."
A young New York actor finds his life imitating his art in this gay theater romance. Read full book review >
Arina, Arina The Most Loved Child by Mamta Reid
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 4, 2016

"A well-meaning book that loses its folkloric appeal in its obvious messages."
In Reid's (The Student Councilor, 2010, etc.) children's picture book and simple parenting guide, the impending birth of a fatherless child sparks lessons in positivity and spiritual healing. Read full book review >

True Born by L.E. Sterling
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 3, 2016

"A sometimes-riveting sci-fi series opener featuring multidimensional characters and an exciting, if violent, climax."
A dystopian YA novel in which sheltered twins realize that their world's problems are more personal than they ever imagined. Read full book review >
The Society by Jodie Andrefski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 3, 2016

"A thoughtful, sensitively drawn examination of bullying, revenge, and personal responsibility."
In Andrefski's (The Girlfriend Request, 2016, etc.) novel, a bullied teen at an elite private school plots revenge against her tormentors during recruitment week for a secret society. Read full book review >
Released: May 3, 2016

"A much-needed reminder that it's OK, even necessary, for mothers to consider their own needs, in addition to their children's."
A knowledgeable parent dispenses advice to harried mothers who've forgotten how to care for themselves. Read full book review >
Stumbling On A Tale by Suzanne Roche
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 2, 2016

"A successful sequel that delivers appealing time travelers thrust into a society filled with knights and dragons."
The Middle Ages beckon in the second installment of this YA time-travel series. Read full book review >
In Those First Bright Days of Elvis by Josephine Rascoe Keenan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 2, 2016

"The King of Rock and Roll presides over this tale of youthful loss and longing."
Elvis is back in the building in Rascoe Keenan's debut novel. Read full book review >
The Chronicles of Spartak by Steven A. Coulter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 2, 2016

"An overripe but still entertaining gay fantasia."
A multitalented, bisexual, teenage slave becomes a symbol of freedom in this debut sci-fi saga. Read full book review >
Sometimes I Sing by Mary Hershberger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 2, 2016

"An engrossing combination of historic renovation, memoir, and literary and religious history."
Restoring a home serves as an extended metaphor for understanding decades-old family dysfunction, informed by Mennonite influences, in this debut memoir. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >