The Improbable Wonders of  Moojie Littleman by Robin Gregory
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"A lively, original take on a story of a boy with more limits—and more magic—than most."
In this YA coming-of-age novel, a disabled boy goes to live on his grandfather's farm, meets a mysterious clan, and discovers special powers. Read full book review >
Rising From the Mire by Christine Grace
Released: Oct. 23, 2015

"Affecting yet inspiring in its positivity."
This collection of insightful, emotionally intuitive short stories by Grace succeeds in honoring the resilience of women around the world. Read full book review >

Peanuts: A Tribute to Charles M. Schulz by Shannon Watters
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"An entertaining testament to the enduring richness of 'Peanuts' and the creativity it still inspires."
Celebrated cartoonists interpret the look, legacy, and worldview of the "Peanuts" comic strip in this vibrant homage to its creator.Read full book review >
Nightmares Unhinged by Joshua Viola
Released: Oct. 11, 2015

"A slew of gloriously disturbing, well-told tales to unnerve readers."
Viola (Luna One, 2014, etc.) amasses a series of blistering horror stories, including a few of his own, from authors who tell of vampires, demons, killers, and things better left hidden in the dark.Read full book review >
Stones in the Road by E. B. Moore
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An appealing Amish twist on a classic narrative."
In a second Amish-themed novel, Moore (An Unseemly Wife, 2014) spins her grandfather's journey West into the rich tale of a prodigal son.Read full book review >

The Vivisection Mambo by Lolita Lark
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A fine anthology of some of the best contemporary poetry around."
Fresh new writers rub elbows with past masters in this scintillating collection of verse. Read full book review >
LIBERTY BAZAAR by David Chadwick
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"This offbeat, refreshingly absorbing Civil War novel features impeccable research and well-realized main characters."
In Chadwick's (High Seas to Home, 2012) historical novel, an escaped slave girl and a former Confederate general meet in 1863 Liverpool. Read full book review >
Faith, Doubt, Mystery by James J. Tracy
Released: Sept. 3, 2015

"A sympathetic but unflinchingly honest testament of indoctrination and embattled faith."
An affecting account of one man's experiences with the Catholic faith. Read full book review >
The Virtuous Feats of the Indomitable Miss Trafalgar and the Erudite Lady Boone by Geonn Cannon
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An imaginatively wrought, steampunk-influenced feminist adventure."
In Cannon's alternative version of early-20th-century London, an invisible spy walks the streets, airships are a preferred form of travel, and two rival explorers join forces to learn who is trying to kill them and why. Read full book review >
Death By Arbitrage or Live Low Die High by Urno Barthel
Released: Aug. 27, 2015

"An extremely clever thriller that dazzles on every level."
This third volume in a series of techno-thrillers pits Chester and Urno's (Death by Tech, 2014, etc.) scientist/sleuth against murderous inside traders. Read full book review >
Clientelligence by Michael B. Rynowecer
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Deftly written and well-presented; principals of any service firm will appreciate this treasure trove of useful intelligence for business improvement."
An in-depth study of what it takes to develop and maintain superior relationships with clients. Read full book review >
Escape from Dorkville by Dean Ammerman
Released: Aug. 10, 2015

"Zany fun in an exciting adventure."
It falls upon 14-year-old Wilkin Delgado and his partner in crime, tug of war champion Alice Jane Zelinski, to save the universe again in the latest installment of Ammerman's (Waiting for the Voo, 2014, etc.) adventures.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >