Released: Oct. 9, 2015

"A smartly observed, important work by an IT expert with a keen eye on the future."
A timely, insightful exploration of the transformational change occurring in information technology. Read full book review >
Better Human by Ronda Conger
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Easy-reading thoughts to ponder in an eye-catching design."
In her energetic self-help debut, Conger offers familiar ideas for personal improvement and success. Read full book review >

Busker's Holiday by Adam Gussow
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"A strongly written, cool novel about being young, bluesy, and free on a vagabond adventure in Europe."
In Gussow's (Mister Satan's Apprentice: A Blues Memoir, 2009) lively road novel, an American grad student spends a wild few weeks as a street musician in Europe. Read full book review >
In the Tree Top by Candide Jones
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"A warmhearted, eye-pleasing new 'Rock-a-Bye Baby' picture book in verse, nicely calibrated for cozy bedtime reading."
Using the well-loved "Rock-a-Bye Baby" lyrics as their springboard, a writer/editor with a literary-press background and her collaborator, an accomplished watercolorist, have created a pretty new picture book shaped around reassuring verses. Read full book review >
Cassowary Hill by David de Vaux
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"Multilayered expat saga best as a showcase of its exotic setting."
In this debut novel, a British expatriate's ghostwriting gig leads to a political showdown involving his retired spook neighbor in Queensland. Read full book review >

Nightscape: Cynopolis by David W. Edwards
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"By turns entertaining, poignant, and heady, a thoroughly enjoyable thrill ride powered by jolts of philosophy."
Through contact with interdimensional beings, a former Black Power activist releases a "thought-virus" that turns dogs wild and people into jackal-headed creatures resembling the ancient Egyptian god Anubis. Read full book review >
Deliver Us From Honor by S.E. Valenti
Released: Oct. 23, 2015

"A robust tale of violence and vendettas."
A family saga of betrayal, brutality, and Sicilian honor. Read full book review >
Creatures On Display  by Wm. Stage
Released: Oct. 29, 2015

"An alluring investigation into the seaminess of sleaze."
From Stage (Not Waving Drowning, 2012, etc.), a novel about sexually transmitted diseases and a man sent to investigate them in 1980s St. Louis.Read full book review >
Fierce Thunder  by Courtney Silberberg
Released: Oct. 29, 2015

"A curvy thriller with a few unexpected turns."
American tourists on a Veracruz biking trip find themselves in the middle of a savage war between the Mexican militia and local contraband-running rebels in the Silberbergs' debut novel. Read full book review >
When the Serpent Bites by Nesly Clerge
Released: Oct. 30, 2015

"An arresting prison tale about penance—and whether it's even wanted."
From debut author Clerge comes a novel about one man's quest to survive prison and find answers within himself. Read full book review >
Lifted to the Wind by Susan Gardner
Released: Oct. 31, 2015

"Precise language and imagery reinforce the conclusion that noticing leads to enlightenment: 'a few things / unremarked / awaken us to this life.'"
Themes of nature, travel, relationships, and current events run through Gardner's (To Inhabit the Felt World, 2013, etc.) collected poems, some of which are also in Spanish. Read full book review >
It's My Pleasure by Dee Ann Turner
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"An excellent resource for anyone tasked with the professional management of others."
A blueprint for fostering a workplace environment that's conducive to both success and moral development. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >