Freaks I've Met by Donald Jans
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 2, 2015

"An engrossing but tongue-in-cheek drama that, even at its most dramatic, will leave readers smiling."
A Spokane college graduate searches for wealth and fame in LA but finds only a string of dead-end jobs and outlandish individuals in Jans' witty debut drama. Read full book review >
Godkiller, Vol. 1 by Matt Pizzolo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 2015

"Deftly unorthodox and wickedly delectable; not so much a story as an experience."
In Pizzolo's stellar graphic novel—the first three issues of his debut comic-book series—an orphan boy braves a desolate, post-apocalyptic land in search of a heart for his sister. Read full book review >

AWAKENING by Shannon Duffy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Loving, imperiled teens on a quest to topple big bad government, with a few good action sequences and a somewhat familiar storyline."
Duffy's (Spectral, 2015, etc.) novel sees teens combating evil in a futuristic age. Read full book review >
COW COUNTRY by Adrian Jones Pearson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 2015

"Goofy academic struggles for those who need a break in the faculty lounge."
A comical novel about life at a zany community college, from debut author Pearson. Read full book review >
SELF-DELIVERANCE by Bernard Otterman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 2015

"An earnest but stiff and uninvolving exploration of love and its discontents."
A suspicious double suicide sparks sexual turmoil and soul-searching among investigators in this knotty, stilted debut novel of ideas. Read full book review >

THE EDUCATION OF A TRAITOR by Svetlana Grobman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 15, 2015

"An intimate look at a young woman's struggle to find her own truth in a repressive society."
Grobman's debut memoir explores her childhood in the Soviet Union. Read full book review >
MISPLACED by S.L. Hulen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 15, 2015

"An imaginative tale sprinkled with a bit of magic and leaving enough unanswered questions to keep readers pondering the possible consequences long after the last page has been turned."
Hulen makes an impressive debut with this enjoyable time-travel fantasy. Read full book review >
DESOLATION CANYON by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 15, 2015

"A grand, well-rounded adventure that mixes nature, Native American lore, and history of the Desolation Canyon region."
London's (The Seasons of Little Wolf, 2014) middle-grade novel follows six people on a transformative rafting trip. Read full book review >
Toro! by Frank C. Schwalbe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 2015

"Shines a light on criminal and bureaucratic complexities in an unusual, poignant narrative that would benefit from a more polished style."
A stripper becomes a med student after suffering a near-fatal attack by the titular Toro, but the past has an odd way of resurfacing. Read full book review >
TREASURE TOWN by Doug Wilhelm
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 20, 2015

"A boisterous, slapstick adventure that will entertain budding readers, despite its skimpy character development."
A trio of adventurous kids and two oddball adults find unexpected treasure in this middle-grade adventure by siblings Wilhelm (The Price of Denial, 2013) and Terrat (True Shoes, 2012). Read full book review >
ONE SEASON OF HOPE by Jim Stovall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A heartwarming story that's 'a little bit about football and an awful lot about life.'"
A novel about small-town high school football, life lessons, and President Harry S. Truman. Read full book review >
REMEMBERERS by C. Edward Baldwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 22, 2015

"A leisurely opening is mere preparation for the fierce struggle to follow—and it's more than worth the wait."
A college student's visions may be effective in a battle against demons in Baldwin's (Fathers House, 2013) supernatural thriller. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >