Stones in the Road by E. B. Moore
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An appealing Amish twist on a classic narrative."
In a second Amish-themed novel, Moore (An Unseemly Wife, 2014) spins her grandfather's journey West into the rich tale of a prodigal son.Read full book review >
The Vivisection Mambo by Lolita Lark
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A fine anthology of some of the best contemporary poetry around."
Fresh new writers rub elbows with past masters in this scintillating collection of verse. Read full book review >

LIBERTY BAZAAR by David Chadwick
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"This offbeat, refreshingly absorbing Civil War novel features impeccable research and well-realized main characters."
In Chadwick's (High Seas to Home, 2012) historical novel, an escaped slave girl and a former Confederate general meet in 1863 Liverpool. Read full book review >
The Virtuous Feats of the Indomitable Miss Trafalgar and the Erudite Lady Boone by Geonn Cannon
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An imaginatively wrought, steampunk-influenced feminist adventure."
In Cannon's alternative version of early-20th-century London, an invisible spy walks the streets, airships are a preferred form of travel, and two rival explorers join forces to learn who is trying to kill them and why. Read full book review >
Death By Arbitrage or Live Low Die High by Urno Barthel
Released: Aug. 27, 2015

"An extremely clever thriller that dazzles on every level."
This third volume in a series of techno-thrillers pits Chester and Urno's (Death by Tech, 2014, etc.) scientist/sleuth against murderous inside traders. Read full book review >

Clientelligence by Michael B. Rynowecer
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Deftly written and well-presented; principals of any service firm will appreciate this treasure trove of useful intelligence for business improvement."
An in-depth study of what it takes to develop and maintain superior relationships with clients. Read full book review >
Lucy Lick-Me-Not and the Greedy Gubbins by Claudine Carmel
Released: July 2, 2015

"A wild tale helmed by a charmingly clever kid."
Child heroine Lucy Lick-Me-Not is back, and this time, she's taking on the seasons and the lack of a white Christmas. Read full book review >
Lucy Lick-Me-Not and the Day Eaters by Claudine Carmel
Released: July 1, 2015

"A charming, wildly imaginative introduction to a brave new girl."
In this fanciful picture book, a birthday disappears and a little girl must get it back. Read full book review >
Miracles and Conundrums of the Secondary Planets by Jacob M Appel
Released: June 30, 2015

"A fine collection of memorable stories with a delicately surreal edge."
Short stories haunted by the longings of their connection-starved characters but mediated by the wry intelligence of their narrators. Read full book review >
The Inconvenience of the Wings by Silas Dent Zobal
Released: June 15, 2015

"Haunting images and poetic prose flood this noteworthy collection."
Zobal's debut collection of well-crafted short stories leaves a lasting impression. Read full book review >
Crossroads by Christopher Conte
Released: June 3, 2015

"A strong collection of memoiristic writing that illuminates African womanhood while blending diverse styles and experiences."
Conte, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, collects 15 autobiographical essays by Ugandan women that question stereotypes of African femininity. Read full book review >
benediction for a black swan by Mimi Zollars
Released: June 2, 2015

"A set by a brilliant new poet, featuring exquisite emotional nuance and an impressive mastery of craft."
A debut collection of poems exploring love, art, and loss. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >