The Mothersea by Stephen Renneberg
FICTION & LITERATURE

"Everything a great sci-fi novel should be: visionary, immersive, and thematically profound."
Renneberg's (In Earth's Service, 2015, etc.) stellar sci-fi sequel to 2013's The Mothership tells a story of alien contact and conflict, and serves as a prequel of sorts to his epic Mapped Space series.Read full book review >
SCARRED by Michael Kenneth Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"Smith knows the Civil War in his bones, and his novel will leave readers emotionally drained but grateful."
This lean Civil War sequel packs in more history and raw emotion than a 600-page epic. Read full book review >

Part of the Family by Jason Hensley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 14, 2016

"An invaluable illumination of small acts of astonishing bravery and generosity in the darkest days of war."
A compassionate, detailed account of a little-known corner of World War II history. Read full book review >
Ann Mary, Contraception and the Pope of Rome by Nancy Taforo-Murphy
FICTION & LITERATURE

"Taforo-Murphy is a born storyteller with a poet's ear and eye, making every line of her hilarious, biting, and vengeful book a pleasure to read."
A debut novel about a religious family that will pack a real wallop for Catholics (or ex-Catholics) of a certain age. Read full book review >
Country Store by Tim Noah
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"An impressive work that takes a mundane journey and makes it a hilarious, melodious adventure."
A veteran children's musician captures the epic proportions of a childhood trek to the country store in this debut sing-along picture book. Read full book review >

The Hole Story of Kirby the Sneak and Arlo the True by Greg Williamson
Released: Jan. 29, 2016

"Brilliantly comic, pleasingly discursive, admirably dexterous, this narrative poem is a tour de force."
As told in rhyming couplets, when a sneaky dog steals a scrupulous dog's hole, things fall apart, sparking philosophical reflections. Read full book review >
Tiburcio! by David Caraccio
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2014

"A lively epic of love, invasion, flight, and revolt in the years following the Mexican-American War."
An ambitious debut novel chronicles the making of an outlaw in frontier California. Read full book review >
Three Days Breathing by Mike Maguire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 21, 2016

"A striking feat of mature, humanistic sci-fi that explores a shocking future."
A sci-fi thriller finds an ordinary family besieged by the structure of its seemingly utopian society. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR

"A valuable, absorbing contribution to the history of women, golden-age Hollywood, and America's magazine culture of the 1930s and '40s."
A biography of Jane Hall, a writer for magazines and movies, traces the complicated, warring pressures of talent and the feminine mystique. Read full book review >
The Topless Widow of Herkimer Street by Jacob M Appel
FICTION & LITERATURE

"Eight more superb stories from a talented pen."
Uncontrollable forces (including the absurd, the magical, and the tragic) upset carefully ordered lives in this short story collection that won the 2016 Howling Bird Press fiction prize. Read full book review >
God of the Internet by Lynn Lipinski
FICTION & LITERATURE

"A deadly and exhilarating game of cat and mouse that has all the makings of an engaging series about fighting terrorists."
Homeland Security agents rush to prevent large-scale cyberwarfare in this thriller. Read full book review >
The Return of Sir Percival by S. Alexander O'Keefe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An engaging and epic yarn that explores the history behind the magic of Camelot."
In the first volume of a saga chronicling the exploits of a knight of the Round Table, Sir Percival returns to Albion only to find that much has changed. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >