iPad Book Apps (page 10)

A PRESENT FOR MILO by Mike Austin
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Dec. 8, 2010

"Here's hoping the paper romp is as engaging as the digital one. (iPad storybook app. 3-6)"
Like a Next Gen version of a lift-the-flap Spot story, this digital cat-and-mouse chase features very simple art, familiar settings and hidden surprises in every scene. Read full book review >
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Dec. 23, 2010

"It's a beautiful little virtual book collection. (iPad storybook app. 4-12)"
Similar in style to the groundbreaking Alice for iPad, this collection of three stories ("The Little Mermaid," "The Emperor's New Clothes" and "The Happy Family") retains the original (translated) texts and illustrations and adds a generous portion of gorgeous, well-integrated animations and eye-catching effects. Read full book review >

IPAD BOOK APPS

"Save it for older kids, who will love seeing how the movable parts work. (iPad storybook app. 5-12)"
Thanks to a memorable marriage of impressive technology and seemingly hand-crafted storytelling, the well-worn piggy tale impresses at every page turn. Read full book review >
COZMO'S DAY OFF by Ayars Animation
IPAD BOOK APPS

"Few story apps are as ambitious, as eye-catching or as playful as Cozmo's. (iPad storybook app. 4-12)"
Clearly produced and filled with Hollywood-quality animation, voice talent and multimedia features, this retro-futurist app is out of this world in many ways. Read full book review >
IPAD BOOK APPS

"Truly an app that grows beyond expectations. (iPad storybook app. 3-10)"
Taking a page out of the Disney playbook (give or take 30 pages), this version of the Jack-versus-Giant tale doesn't offer sparkling prose. Read full book review >

IPAD BOOK APPS

"The pages work just as effectively when viewed upside-down, a good reason for repeated readings. (iPad storybook app. 4-10)"
For readers still unconvinced that the features of the iPad can translate printed children's books into full-blown multimedia experiences, this one will change your point of view. Read full book review >
TEDDY'S DAY by Bruno Hächler
Kirkus Star
by Bruno Hächler, illustrated by Birte Müller, developed by Auryn Inc.
IPAD BOOK APPS

"Subtle, surprising and ultimately spectacular. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)"
A little girl ponders the secret life of her stuffed bear and attempts to catch him in the act. Read full book review >
IPAD BOOK APPS

"Elegant, easy to navigate and beautiful, it combines the best of print and digital. (iPad storybook app. 2 & up)"
Startling in its mix of digital and traditional book design, Loud Crow Interactive's first iPad book app translates the text and illustrations of the Beatrix Potter classic into electronic pages that appear to live and breathe beneath readers' fingertips. Read full book review >
GREEN EGGS & HAM by Dr. Seuss
Kirkus Star
by Dr. Seuss, illustrated by Dr. Seuss, developed by Oceanhouse Media
IPAD BOOK APPS

"While navigation is wisely kept out of the way outside of the main menu, the only way to restart the book or access any options in Auto Play mode is, regrettably, to quit the app entirely using the iPad's Home button. (iPad storybook app. 2-8)"
Some stories never grow old. Read full book review >
IPAD BOOK APPS

"It's remarkably different in look, tone and structure from most story apps, a true original in an App Store filled with cartoon tie-ins, princess programming and retrofitted children's classics. (iPad storybook/puzzle app. 4-10)"
Bartleby is a lover of buttons, switches, knobs and dials, and the first volume of his iPad adventures details his trip to Mystery Island. Read full book review >
ALICE FOR THE iPAD by Lewis Carroll
IPAD BOOK APPS

"The interactive bits may seem like overkill, but the cohesive, thrilling design in some parts and restraint in other areas (eschewing narration, for instance, in favor of a text-only approach) makes it a powerful demonstration of the iPad's storytelling potential. (iPad storybook app. 5 & up)"
An old classic made new sacrifices nothing in adaptation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >