THE UNWANTED GUEST by Jacqueline O. Rogers
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Strongly atmospheric art and story-centered design give this a leg up over more gamelike apps, but wait for an update with better editing. (source note) (iPad storybook app. 7-11)"
Uneven synchronization of animations and voiceovers mar this retelling of a Yiddish tale about an old man driven out of his house when Poverty takes up residence. Read full book review >
THE PEDLAR LADY OF GUSHING CROSS by Jacqueline O. Rogers
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: July 25, 2010

"A magisterial rendition, with the digital bells and whistles kept firmly in service to the story. (source note) (iPad storybook app. 7-11)"
A stately animated version of a traditional wisdom tale better known as "The Pedlar of Swaffham," or "The Treasure." Read full book review >

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS HD by Chocolapps
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: March 17, 2011

"It just goes to show that even with a unique take on a classic, you can still go wrong with the basics. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)"
There must be something about the (rights-free) story of the three homeowner pigs and that hungry wolf that appeals to iPad-app developers. There are so many versions of it—at least 20 by our count—for Apple's tablet that it's fair to say it's become a blank slate upon which to try different features on an easy, familiar story. Read full book review >
RUNAWAY RADISH by Janice Levy
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: March 19, 2011

"The Runaway Radish (who, spoiler alert, doesn't exactly make it out of the story intact) is entertainingly chaotic, and this 'Gingerbread Man' variant is a good effort in both Spanish and English. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)"
Although markedly different in tone and style from most iPad storybook apps (though no less worthy), this English-and-Spanish tale of a food sculptor and a mischievous, fast-moving root vegetable is fun and has some features that make it worth multiple readings. Read full book review >
MONKEY AND CROC by Will Terry
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Although designed for the iPad, this playful text fails to take advantage of the platform, ultimately providing an only mildly amusing user experience. (iPad storybook app. 4-6)"
In this simple jungle tale done as an app, Monkey and Croc are both going about their individual daily routines—but, unbeknownst to Monkey, he is quite close to becoming Croc's next meal as their parallel routines dangerously converge. Read full book review >

BAD WOLF by Label1
developed by Label1
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Feb. 28, 2011

"The audience for this app is probably college students looking for additions to their 'bad English' collections, but will they pay $4.99 for it? (iPad storybook app. 10 & up)"
A "cool" cartoon version of "Little Red Riding Hood" challenges both the traditional perspective and readers' tolerance for imperfect English. Read full book review >
JEREMY FISHER by Beatrix Potter
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Feb. 18, 2011

"High production values and a story-centered design give this a leg up over flashier, more game-like e-books. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
Potter's tale of a hapless frog who sets out to catch a minnow for dinner and almost ends up being dinner himself gets several useful extras in this unabridged app. It also receives a design upgrade that increases the original's cramped trim size and eliminates its blank pages while pairing text and pictures more closely together. Read full book review >
VIOLET AND THE MYSTERY NEXT DOOR by Allison Keeme
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Feb. 21, 2011

"All enhance the overall air of high good humor. (iPad storybook app. 6-8)"
A relatively small number of animations and interactive effects embellish an engaging, sometimes laugh-out-loud detective story. Read full book review >
THE GOING TO BED BOOK by Sandra Boynton
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: March 7, 2011

"Peter Rabbit while styling itself perfectly to Boynton's whimsy. (Ipad board-book app. 1-3)"
Preserving the look of the classic board book—even to the trim size and rounded corners—this makeover folds new into old in such inventive ways that it may take more than a few passes to discover all the interactive features. Read full book review >
HANSEL AND GRETEL by Yasmin Studios
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Oct. 2, 2010

"Quick, somebody scoop up those breadcrumbs. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)"
Not unlike creepy-eyed dolls that never seem quite as cute as they're meant to be, there's something a little off about this adaptation of the Brothers Grimm tale. Read full book review >
THE LION AND THE MOUSE HD by Stepworks Company
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: July 22, 2010

"Neither is a little bit of thoughtful, well-executed storytelling—truly adorable. (iPad storybook app. 2-8)"
Neatly balancing between too complicated and too simple, this app packs an abundance of cuteness into a deceptively minimalist package. Read full book review >
THE THREE LITTLE PIGS by Nosy Crow
Kirkus Star
by Nosy Crow, illustrated by Ed Bryan, developed by Nosy Crow
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Feb. 16, 2011

"It amply shows that this old dog—er, pig—can still learn new tricks. (iPad storybook app. 5-7)"
This, the umpteenth app based on the familiar tale, rises far above most of its brethren. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >