AMERICA'S HORSES AND PONIES by Irene Brady
Kirkus Star

AMERICA'S HORSES AND PONIES

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The ultimate album for the serious fancier: the thirty-eight most popular breeds meticulously drawn (to scale) and knowledgeably described by a new author-illustrator who'll give Anderson a run for his money. An introductory section defines terms and diagrams the parts of a horse; its evolution is briefly traced, concluding with the warning ""to read several different sources before deciding what to believe about the widely divergent theories."" The bulk of the book consists of information on each breed--its conformation, origins, history, current status, unique features--plus a full-page illustration. While some of the examples tend to look overmuch like lustrous sculptures, the statuesque quality is not inappropriate for showing distinctive traits. Miss Brady is not only instructive, she's interesting--on the much magnified mustang and his sorry history, on the handicap of handicapping, on the Arizona dairy that's gone back to Belgians and the Amish who've never given up their Percherons. There are also appreciative portrayals of the mule and burro (""or donkey, whichever you prefer""), a view of the vanishing wild equines, and a final grouping that is really wild--the zebra-horse hybrid dubbed the zebrorse, the zebra-pony cross called the zeony, the zebra-donkey match named the - - - - - -. You won't find that in your standard guide; neither will you find a juvenile that provides a similarly full and up-to-date biography of as many breeds.

Pub Date: Oct. 23rd, 1969
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin