THE ENVIRONMENT by Irving Adler

THE ENVIRONMENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Despite the early references to photosynthesis, oxygen and other cycles, and food chains (which Adler doesn't bother to relate to his subsequent points), this is less a scientific description of environmental interdependence than a conventional summary of ""what we must do to keep our environment clean and its storehouse full."" Citing, in a few simple paragraphs each, such problems as vanishing species, depletion of non-renewable ""treasures,"" and air and water pollution, Adler points out that man's population growth and unique interference with nature's balance have unwanted side effects, and he warns that we need to save and recycle, make laws, and let the developing countries have their share. It sounds like an outline for a 1970 Earth Day program; by now, some of the bland assumptions are questionable and others certainly simplistic. However, you might think of it as an overviewing classroom introduction to more down-to-earth study--or as propaganda in a good cause.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1976
Page count: 48pp
Publisher: John Day