THE TRIAL OF STEVEN TRUSCOTT by Isabel Lebourdais

THE TRIAL OF STEVEN TRUSCOTT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Six years ago, Steven Truscott, a fourteen year old boy with a fine school record--a good sport, reliable, steady, was convicted of the psychotic rape-murder of a schoolmate chiefly on the evidence that he was last seen with her. He had given Lynne Harper a ride on his bike. With exemplary care, Mrs. Lebourdais examines how this guilt by association led to its almost incredible assumption even though there never was anything but the most suppositious evidence. In cold print, her review of the case could not be more convincing as she goes over the actual transcript; the alleged time of death (which was never contested and certainly should have been according to forensic medicine); the inconclusive autopsy; one child's minimal ""story""; the soiled underpants and slightly torn jeans which incriminated Steven; all the way down to the fact that this was both a ""factually and psychologically impossible"" crime. As one lawyer said, ""The poor kid never had a chance"" and perhaps this hortatory, challenging, saddening reexamination will reopen the case. The book has already stirred considerable interest in Canada, where in Ontario Steven was sentenced to hang (commuted to life) and it will be strongly sponsored here.

Pub Date: Aug. 22nd, 1966
Publisher: Lippincott