LOVE MUST NOT BE WASTED by Isabella Taves

LOVE MUST NOT BE WASTED

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Now that we've taken the wraps off one unmentionable, at last we've begun to explore that other considered pornography -- death. But as with sex, already the subject appears to be in danger of becoming analyzed to death; how we die looms larger than the way we live -- the quality of life. Tares (Women Alone, 1969), who became a widow nine years ago after twenty years of marriage, has thought a great deal about the process, still so little understood, by which we mourn a person, a way of life -- grief, ""one of the major crises. . . ."" She writes of her own experience and that of others, and while she has some valuable insights into the trauma, her intensive preoccupation has led Tares to wondering about her own death. Along with interviewing professionals who care for the terminally ill, she's taken a course, signed the Euthanasia Society's Living Will which pleads for quick disposition in a clinically hopeless case -- and with it all organized and prepared for, one hopes that presently Tares will turn to some life-sustaining project.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1974
Publisher: T.Y. Crowell