LIBERTY STREET, AMERICA by I.V. Morris

LIBERTY STREET, AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A small central American own, Santa Rosa, as the microcosm of the world conflict between democracy and fascism in the story of a group of refugees, blocked there in the attempt to reach the United States. The central figure is Marie-Te, Austrian aristocrat, sympathetic, gay, gracious, big-hearted and with no snobbishness. With her are her Uncle Konrad and her young brother, Bubi. Together with other refugees they face the obstacle of Harrington, American Minister with a Fascist caste of mind, refusing visas to all but caught by the youth and beauty of Marie-Te. His subordinate, John Camberley, complete contrast in temperament and viewpoint, also falls in love with her. The crisis comes when Bubi falls ill with a fatal malaria and requires quick deportation to the States. Harrington denies the emergency visa. In revenge, Kerjanian, shabby, desperate and indignant Armenian, typifying the eternal outcast, murders Harrington. Violent means to a desired end. Occasional whimsy, romance, fervor in interplay.

Pub Date: Feb. 16th, 1943
Publisher: Harper