MADLY SINGING IN THE MOUNTAINS by Ivan--Ed. Morris

MADLY SINGING IN THE MOUNTAINS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An Appreciation and Anthology of Arthur Waley whom Edith Sitwell called ""unconquerable."" So he was even through the last racking illness (cancer). And along with her brothers she often testified to his ""miraculous art."" He ""emanated an atmosphere of peacefulness"" and was also a ""man of many silences"" although Peter Quennell, another contributor, found them unnerving. Many people comment on his translations where his genius was most manifest--fastidious and yet informal, truly ""re-creative"" rather than literal. Arthur Waley not only introduced Chinese poetry and the landmark Tale of the Genji to the Western world but also the No theatre and Zen. Perhaps most remarkable is the fact that he was an autodidact and never visited China and Japan, or for that matter had any speaking familiarity with the Oriental languages he taught himself along with Mongol, Ainu and Sanskrit. Friends, his brother and his wife all contribute pieces--the latter's closing ""You're bound to get it all wrong."" ""Yes. I know."" For the rest, there's a considerable selection of his translations of poetry and prose, one taped interview and miscellaneous essays in this commemorative volume.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1969
Publisher: Walker