WALKING TALKING WORDS by Ivan Sherman

WALKING TALKING WORDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In the first of Sherman's cartoons, the letters EAT sport teeth and appear in a nested arrangement so that the E is chomping the A and the A in turn is biting into the T. He uses more teeth in the word TALK, forms CLIMB into steps (more or less), and shows SQUEEZE being squeezed by an over-affectionate Great Aunt. But most of the illustrations are either confusingly overelaborate or (more often) arranged in ways that have nothing to do with the letters themselves. (For example, the letters BOX are simply put into a box.) In most cases the limericks that accompany the pictures are flat and forced, and only tangentially related to the pictures and the key words in each. The jacket flap declares that this letter play teaches ""words and their concepts,"" but it doesn't really demonstrate any applicable principle. It might be justified purely as fun with form and meaning, but most of the entries aren't as much fun as the general idea might suggest.

Pub Date: Sept. 11th, 1980
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich