INVESTIGATING THE UNEXPLAINED: A Compendium of Disquieting Mysteries of the Natural World by Ivan T. Sanderson

INVESTIGATING THE UNEXPLAINED: A Compendium of Disquieting Mysteries of the Natural World

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Rattling around the skeleton closets of science is nothing new for Sanderson who encountered giant bats years ago (see Animal Treasury, 1937) and more recently the bones of a seven-foot penguin (in More ""Things,"" 1969) and this is more of the same zealous tracking down inexplicable natural phenomena coupled with defensive swipes at lab-curtain hypocrisy. Herein Sanderson offers photographic ""proof"" that sea monsters (including that Loch Ness lovely) really do exist -- they are either gigantic caecilians or tatzelwurms and anyone who doesn't agree ought to be ""certified""; he discusses oddities among eggs and the origin of petrified oranges; he documents numerous cases of spontaneous human combustion (the elderly are especially prone and sweat seems to be the trigger); he argues that pre-Christian civilization had harnessed electricity, had TV, bulldozers, etc.; and ""boldly"" reports that ""fafrotskies"" (objects from the sky -- bricks, black pebbles, angel hair, rubbery tangibles -- all listed in Appendix B) are evidence of communications from other universes. Much of this is interesting and some of Sanderson's disturbing mysteries deserve further investigation; but his strident arrogance and hysterical grudge against the scientific establishment for not accepting his flimsy ""proofs"" undermine the book.

Pub Date: Feb. 11th, 1971
Publisher: Prentice-Hall