THE BOSNIAN CHRONICLE by Ivo ndric

THE BOSNIAN CHRONICLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

obel prize winner Andric's third and longest novel in his Bosnian trilogy. Concerned directly with the history of the Bosnian people, this follows Jean Daville, French consul, who is there to make straight the way for French ""interests"". These include Napoleon's expansion of Empire to the east. Bosnia, half eastern-half western, is under the control of the Ottoman Empire and watched closely by Russia and Austria. aville, a child of his time, spends seven years enmeshed in the intrigue of peridious Turks, Christian sects and the English and Austrian agents. In 1814, when ouis XVIII succeeds Napoleon, Daville and family go home. For Bosnia, he was only ripple in the sea--the cross-point for the stories of many very different kinds of men. Philosophical detachment lends Andric's work great authority, although the style does not always command reader attention.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1963
Publisher: Knopf