THE WORLD OF LEONARDO DA VINCI by Ivor B. Hart

THE WORLD OF LEONARDO DA VINCI

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Although the style is somewhat stuffy and the scholarship full of stiff-upper-lipism, Ivor Hart's Da Vinci definitely ranks with the few fine 20th century assessments yet give to the greatest all-round genius the world has known. After covering the remarkable diversity and drama of the emerging Renaissance, its politics, culture, science and technology, when arms were playthings and war a sport. Doctor Hart, brilliantly anatomizing mountains of research and references and the famous Notebooks, then goes on to document Leonardo's studies in physics and engineering, where he produced a forerunner of the steam engine, and in aeronautics, where he planned manpowered flight and the Newtonian principle of Inertin. For us, Leonardo might seem a glorious in the of our Organization Man: born out of wedlock, a non-professional and a free lancer, he lived in a time of constant storm and stress and went from one economic insecurity to another; he was also left-handed and, if a monograph can be credited, sexually maladjusted, yet he conquered the world of art and science with a mastery unknown before or since, striving as Hart so splendidly shows towards the ""perfection of his life and his world"".

Pub Date: Sept. 11th, 1962
Publisher: Viking