WHITE WATER, STILL WATER by J. Allan Bosworth

WHITE WATER, STILL WATER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It follows the very popular theme of a boy lost in the wilderness, many miles from civilization and home. Thirteen year old Christian Holm preferred reading and day-dreaming to the life predicated by his family's Canadian homestead. When his raft drifted into the river and carried him far downstream, he found that he had practically no knowledge or experience to help him, but he did manage to walk the hundred miles back home, and to grow up some in the process. The author's enthusiasm and knowledge of the outdoors, which was demonstrated but overburdened by animism in Voices in the Meadow (1964), is shown to much better advantage here. Christian's trek always seems convincing and the wilderness real. The total helplessness of the boy and the ways in which he is gradually forced to acquire experience and a little stamina are well developed. Boys may find Christian's basic delicacy hard to sympathize with and may wish that the descriptions had been lightened with a little humor, but on the whole this is good reading.

Pub Date: Feb. 4th, 1965
Publisher: Doubleday