THE MAN WHO FOUNDED GEORGIA by J. Gordon Vaeth

THE MAN WHO FOUNDED GEORGIA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sometimes the story of James Edward Oglethorpe, sometimes the story of the founding of Georgia, much of the time just plain fill. From a detailed account of Oglethorpe's early life and interest in establishing a colony for England's worthy indigents, the author switches to straight narration of forays against the Spanish, and then back to Oglethorpe's retirement to the comforts of London society. Manual-labored descriptions of loading cannon and lengthy accounts of military maneuvers preempt attention from the major historical fact of the era, the Spanish-English fight for power. Oglethorpe, because of his charm, courage and military bent, was the Crown's chosen instrument to establish a bastion and buffer for the southern colonies; here Oglethorpe appears as the author of that policy. In an epilogue the reader is urged to visit Georgia's landmarks, to ""make history come alive""--it doesn't in the book.

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 1968
Publisher: Crowell-Collier