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THE OBSESSION OF HENRY ENRIGHT

An unnerving, intricate debut novel offering insight into a fabled yet flawed age.

A wrenching, tumultuous coming-of-age tale from a first-time novelist.

At the start of this unsettling, raw debut, Henry Enright is driving through the heat of summer with his girlfriend, Laura. He just identified the car-wrecked bodies of his gang of small-town friends. With this beginning, the narrative sets a painfully nostalgic mood, snaking through a rigidity and sense of loss that threaten to overwhelm the narrator. The tale unfolds through alternating eras, from a humiliating 1950s Catholic schoolyard brawl to the heartbreak of middle-aged banality, despair and alcoholism on the edge of the 1980s. Triggered by his return to the small community of Union, Mass., Henry is haunted by painful memories while he reflects on the path that’s led him to overwhelming dissatisfaction in his career, his marriage and his role as a father. As the displaced adolescent Henry seeks greater acceptance from his schoolmates and the love of beautiful, promiscuous Laura, he confronts both deeper rejections and the consequences of his rebellious reputation. Though occasionally in need of minor edits, Lorden’s novel shows the anguish and obsession of a sensitive young man living a restrictive and prohibitive religion, area and age. Battered by misunderstandings and heartache, Henry faces only pressure and cruel treatment at the hands of peers, elders and his own troubled psyche. Through his achingly honest account, he also offers a glimpse of the racism and anti-Semitism rampant in the time and place. Lorden treads a fine, hopeful line in the end, attempting a resolution for these deeper rifts as the adult Henry is forced into confronting not only his past but the underlying yearnings of his soul.

An unnerving, intricate debut novel offering insight into a fabled yet flawed age.

Pub Date: July 11, 2011

ISBN: 978-1462036721

Page Count: 182

Publisher: iUniverse

Review Posted Online: May 11, 2012

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LONG ISLAND

A moving portrait of rueful middle age and the failure to connect.

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An acclaimed novelist revisits the central characters of his best-known work.

At the end of Brooklyn (2009), Eilis Lacey departed Ireland for the second and final time—headed back to New York and the Italian American husband she had secretly married after first traveling there for work. In her hometown of Enniscorthy, she left behind Jim Farrell, a young man she’d fallen in love with during her visit, and the inevitable gossip about her conduct. Tóibín’s 11th novel introduces readers to Eilis 20 years later, in 1976, still married to Tony Fiorello and living in the titular suburbia with their two teenage children. But Eilis’ seemingly placid existence is disturbed when a stranger confronts her, accusing Tony of having an affair with his wife—now pregnant—and threatening to leave the baby on their doorstep. “She’d known men like this in Ireland,” Tóibín writes. “Should one of them discover that their wife had been unfaithful and was pregnant as a result, they would not have the baby in the house.” This shock sends Eilis back to Enniscorthy for a visit—or perhaps a longer stay. (Eilis’ motives are as inscrutable as ever, even to herself.) She finds the never-married Jim managing his late father’s pub; unbeknownst to Eilis (and the town), he’s become involved with her widowed friend Nancy, who struggles to maintain the family chip shop. Eilis herself appears different to her old friends: “Something had happened to her in America,” Nancy concludes. Although the novel begins with a soap-operatic confrontation—and ends with a dramatic denouement, as Eilis’ fate is determined in a plot twist worthy of Edith Wharton—the author is a master of quiet, restrained prose, calmly observing the mores and mindsets of provincial Ireland, not much changed from the 1950s.

A moving portrait of rueful middle age and the failure to connect.

Pub Date: May 7, 2024

ISBN: 9781476785110

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: Feb. 3, 2024

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2024

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ALL FOURS

This tender, strange treatise on getting out from the “prefab structures” of a conventional life is quintessentially July.

A woman set to embark on a cross-country road trip instead drives to a nearby motel and becomes obsessed with a local man.

According to Harris, the husband of the narrator of July’s novel, everyone in life is either a Parker or a Driver. “Drivers,” Harris says, “are able to maintain awareness and engagement even when life is boring.” The narrator knows she’s a Parker, someone who needs “a discrete task that seems impossible, something…for which they might receive applause.” For the narrator, a “semi-famous” bisexual woman in her mid-40s living in Los Angeles, this task is her art; it’s only by haphazard chance that she’s fallen into a traditional straight marriage and motherhood. When the narrator needs to be in New York for work, she decides on a solo road trip as a way of forcing herself to be more of a metaphorical Driver. She makes it all of 30 minutes when, for reasons she doesn’t quite understand, she pulls over in Monrovia. After encountering a man who wipes her windows at a gas station and then chats with her at the local diner, she checks in to a motel, where she begins an all-consuming intimacy with him. For the first time in her life, she feels truly present. But she can only pretend to travel so long before she must go home and figure out how to live the rest of a life that she—that any woman in midlife—has no map for. July’s novel is a characteristically witty, startlingly intimate take on Dante’s “In the middle of life’s journey, I found myself in a dark wood”—if the dark wood were the WebMD site for menopause and a cheap room at the Excelsior Motel.

This tender, strange treatise on getting out from the “prefab structures” of a conventional life is quintessentially July.

Pub Date: May 14, 2024

ISBN: 9780593190265

Page Count: 336

Publisher: Riverhead

Review Posted Online: Feb. 3, 2024

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2024

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