BEGINNINGS OF LEARNING by J. Krishnamurti

BEGINNINGS OF LEARNING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Edited transcripts of Krishnamurti's conversations with students and staff at Brockwood Park, an English school he founded forteen agers, and with parents, teachers, and young seekers in the U.S. and in India. Krishnamurti comes across as a rather didactic Socrates, goading his disciples into asking big, fundamental questions and making them aware of where they really stand. His main point is that education must concern itself with the complete human being and demands the willingness to pursue whatever path of truth intelligence discloses. But in print the conversations lack the dramatic spark that must have charged the original encounters. The book counts on an unlimited enthusiasm for Krishnamurti to weather the tedium of such slow-footed talk. The few provocative notions and occasional flashes of decent prose might have combined to make a strong, brief essay; but the lumbering question-and-answer format muffles their impact.

Pub Date: June 25th, 1975
Publisher: Harper & Row