THE LOST TOWNS AND ROADS OF AMERICA by J. R. Humphreys

THE LOST TOWNS AND ROADS OF AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This unpretentious and copiously illustrated volume tells of a land-voyage across a large section of this country, a chronicle of unperilous adventure in search of a living American past that is not so much ""Lost"" as overlooked or bypassed. Arming themselves with maps of all varieties (the best were those found free in filling-stations) and traveling in a Volkswagen Combi-Kamper, the author, his wife and his camera started their travels in Navesink, New Jersey, and ended them in California, with side-excursions as the spirit moved them. Sleeping in their car, eating by the side of the road or in fine restaurants, they photographed as they went: old roads still in use and newer roads now deserted, fences and trees, quiet villages in Indiana and Iowa, mining towns in Colorado, the hidden towns of the past days of Mormonism in Utah. Seldom following thruways but wandering on side roads, they found themselves in farmyards and on Main Streets, where they inspected a Masonic Hall or an Opera House. Supplementing in a way Stewart's Names on the Land and U.S. 40, this book is one to be read at leisure. For family motorists rather than for those who drive 400 miles in a day, it will appeal to all those who like to climb in a car and go somewhere, as well as to amateur photographers, home-acre explorers, and those small-town antiquarians who have forgotten that their immediate surroundings may be of historic interest. The superb photographs will delight even those who travel in city taxicabs.

Publisher: Doubleday