A CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO LEGAL RIGHTS by J. Shane Creamer

A CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO LEGAL RIGHTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another entry in the recent rush of ""know-your-legal-rights"" literature, this one is by the Attorney General of Pennsylvania and it is sanguine and placid beyond belief. Creamer assures us that at this very moment, ""with the assistance of vast federal funds, courts, police, and corrective units all over America are being rapidly updated, renewed and revitalized"" -- not exactly the impression we got of the legal labyrinth from Leonard Downie's Justice Denied (p. 406). Creamer focuses on procedural or due process rights guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment and amplified by recent Supreme Court decisions -- Mapp v. Ohio, Terry v. Ohio, Siborn v. New York, etc. The author provides a concise and generally congratulatory summary of the Court's wisdom, defining en route the exact circumstances under which a law officer is entitled to detain, interrogate, frisk, search or arrest you in your home or car or on the street. It's nice to know that there is a long checklist of ""guilt-laden facts"" which the police are obliged to scrutinize before ""probable cause"" for hauling you in is established but this is definitely a presentation of ""how it's spozed to be."" Both Stephen Gillers, Getting Justice (p. 406) and Norman Dorsen, The Rights of Americans (p. 83), provide more realistic, pragmatic and comprehensive surveys of present conflicts between civil liberties and police powers.

Pub Date: July 29th, 1971
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston