A REASONABLE DOUBT by J. W. Ehrlich

A REASONABLE DOUBT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Author of owl of the Censor and numerous other books and subject of the biography Never Plead Guilty, Ehrlich is a California attorney of some 40 years' experience. A Reasonable Doubt is a pot pourri of short essays on the legal aspects of civil rights, social welfare, religious freedom, and politics, in which he rails against certain types of Congressional investigations and against imputation of a sinister meaning to every nvocation of the Fifth Amendment. He sets forth also his views on narcotics addiction, obscenity, organized crime, legal insanity, juvenile delinquency, and the laws on marriage, divorce, and abortion. The book has, actually, two contradictory themes. Although Ehrlich repeats emphatically the determinist doctrine that man ""in every sense a by-product of history,"" on the other hand he offers specific and reasonable-sounding programs for attacking some of history's most vexing problems -- such as his projected substitute for existing welfare codes. He believes that even the most undesirable of America's 55 million laws were enacted with good intent, and that legal reform is an ongoing process in which citizens should take a greater interest than they do. This is well worth reading.

Pub Date: March 16th, 1964
Publisher: World