THE CONCRETE WILDERNESS by Jack Couffer

THE CONCRETE WILDERNESS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A boy and a dog story with a difference--some of which comes through the unknown asides on the background here, New York, a wildlife terrain not only for reaches, rats and pigeons, but also falcons, scarab beetles, opossums. Archie, a teenage country boy, via his father (now dead) favors animals over human beings and is now attached to Wolf, a dog to be sold as a laboratory animal. Wolf's treatment before he escapes is so brutal that he reverts to a savage state, eventually attacks the city toughs who have decided to pick on Archie. The sub-plot includes Martin, a photographer, and his excursions with Archie around the city with its surprising tenants, and the climax, attended by the ASPCA, the police, and curious but frightened crowds, has a certain excitement. Ex-zoologist and Disney cameraman Couffer (Song of Wild Laughter-1963) tells a good story with certainly an alternate audience in mind.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Meredith