PRAY TO THE HUSTLERS' GOD by Jack Donahue

PRAY TO THE HUSTLERS' GOD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

First installment in a new legal beagle series, this time featuring Raymond Burr--or rather Harlan Cole--in the courtrooms of Houston and defending an innocent man accused of murdering lecherous Chip O'Neal, coach of the Houston Roustabouts, and his secretary Marla. Both are found dead in a parking lot outside the fabulous Galleria Complex on the night that O'Neal is to be feted. Had they been having an affair? Houston, the murder capital of the world, and hub of American oildom, offers a splashy, whiskey-soaked backdrop for the series. Harlan Cole is grave, gruff, grumpy, depressed, sententious (his main verb is ""plan"" as in ""I plan to tie my shoelaces when I get up in the morning"" or as in planning to cross the room as he crosses the room); his henchmen include Fausto, a snooper who uses 25¢ words (""Listen, Harlan. We've been hallowed by the hispidulous honey pot of heterodoxy""), and his sexy secretary Margaret, widow of his late partner, with whom the winds of romance blow hot and cold. Donahue has indeed prayed to the book-hustler's god, and his prayers are likely to be answered.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1977
Publisher: Reader's Digest--dist. by T. Y. Crowell