THE DAVIS CUP CONSPIRACY by Jack M. Bickham

THE DAVIS CUP CONSPIRACY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

What looks like a routine Davis Cup qualifying match in Caracas, Venezuela, turns into a routine political thriller when rebels stage a long-planned revolt to assassinate the president and, if necessary, disrupt the match. Reluctantly accepting the temporary cover assignment of team captain, tennis-pro-cum-spy Brad Davis (Double Fault, 1993, etc.) has his hands full even before the revolution. His heavily favored team acts like a bunch of misfits and losers (one of them has fallen victim to honey-pot pressure to throw his match); his patrician host Francisco Díaz's sluttish daughter-in-law Trudi seems determined to take him to bed; Trudi's husband, Peter, and his brother Richard are obviously locked in a political feud. Finding his former London contact and lover, Linda Bennett, in town looks like Brad's only bright spot. But he blows his cover when he single-handedly repels a rebel assault on the Díaz compound and gets caught spending too much quality time with Linda; both of them are promptly snatched by the ragtag forces of charismatic revolutionary Ramón Abrego. Luckily, a hint that the uprising was scheduled for this weekend brings government reprisals and the blessed sound of US warplanes. But wait: Even after the revolution is crushed, enough rebels survive to plot the death of the president, or of Brad, or of who knows who else. Top-flight tennis on clay courts, intercut with an appealingly amateurish terrorist mÉlange. You'll be glad to know that the rebels are squashed and the assassination aborted. But if you want the big story -- whether Brad's boys pull off that qualifying match -- you'll just have to read the book.

Pub Date: July 1st, 1994
Page count: 384pp
Publisher: Forge -- dist. by St. Martin's