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THE HISTORY AND ACHIEVEMENT OF THE NAACP by Jacqueline L. Harris

THE HISTORY AND ACHIEVEMENT OF THE NAACP

By Jacqueline L. Harris

Age Range: 12 & up

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1992
ISBN: 0-531-11035-4

 In ``The African-American Experience'' series, a compelling, well-researched look at the organization that, working through negotiation, legislation, and the courts, has been one of the most powerful advocates of equal opportunity and civil rights. Beginning with the NAACP's founding by blacks and whites in 1909- 11, Harris takes an issue-by-issue approach to its activities: pressure for an anti-lynching bill (defeated by a Senate filibuster in 1922); voting rights (the NAACP's first Supreme Court victory, in 1915, about literacy tests for voters); housing; transportation; education (segregation in the North was successfully challenged as early as 1915); and bigotry in the military (US officials tried to prejudice Europeans against black troops in both World Wars). Harris deepens her story with telling specifics of injustice (Edith Wilson prompted segregation in federal employment that persisted for a generation) and with outstanding achievements (Thurgood Marshall, acting for the NAACP, won 29 out of 31 cases before the Supreme Court). After an interview with Executive Director Benjamin Hooks on future goals, the author ends on a poignantly rational personal note: as an African-American, she expresses heartbreak at ``centuries long humiliation,'' discouragement with the incessant search for loopholes in new legislation, but hope that, in the end, perseverance will overcome them. Chronology; source notes; bibliography; text of ``The Call''; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)